Napoleon and the French people under his empire, by the author of Bonaparte and the French people under his consulate. From the Germ

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Page 279 - Buonaparte of high treason, in the full assembly, against the honour of France, her children, and humanity ; that he entered into the full details of the poisoning of the sick, and the massacre of the garrison ; aggravating these crimes by charging...
Page 274 - Jaffa by assault, many of the garrison were put to the sword ; but the greater part flying into the mosques, and imploring mercy from their pursuers, were granted their lives; and let it be well. remembered...
Page 279 - ... soldiers, who had suffered so much for their country, perished thus miserably by the order of its idol. Is there a Frenchman whose blood does not chill with horror at the recital of such a fact. Surely the manes of these murdered unoffending people must be now hovering round the seat of government...
Page 275 - Buonaparte, who had expressed much resentment at the compassion manifested by his troops, and determined to relieve himself from the maintenance and care of three thousand eight hundred prisoners, ordered these to be marched to a rising ground near Jaffa ; where a division of French infantry formed against them.
Page 170 - He is a stranger, a foreigner, and an usurper ; he unites in his own person every thing that a pure Republican must detest ; every thing that an enraged jacobin has abjured ; every thing that a sincere and faithful Royalist must feel as an insult. If he is opposed at any time in his career, what is his appeal ? He appeals to his fortune; in other words to his army and his sword. Placing, then, his whole reliance upon military support, can he afford to let his military renown pass away, to let his...
Page 277 - The next circumstance is of a nature which requires indeed the most particular details to establish, since the idea can scarce be entertained that the commander of an army should order his...
Page 276 - Bonaparte, who had been regarding the scene through a telescope, when he saw the smoke ascending, could not restrain his joy, but broke out into exclamations of approval ; indeed, he had just reason to dread the refusal of his troops thus to dishonour themselves.
Page 282 - French ai'my penetrated, and she will at least hesitate to believe that the same armies should voluntarily ameliorate their conduct in a country more remote, where the atrocities they might commit would be less liable to publicity; and that this extraordinary change should be in favour of a people, whose principles and resistance might have excited the resentment of more generous invaders. I will not enter into an...
Page x - Of whatever elements public spirit is composed, it is always and everywhere the chief defensive principle of a state. It is perfectly distinct from courage. Perhaps no nation, certainly no European nation, ever perished from an inferiority of courage. And undoubtedly no considerable nation was ever subdued, in which the public affections were sound and vigorous. It is public spirit which binds together the dispersed courage of individuals, and fastens it to the commonwealth. It is, therefore, as...
Page 278 - ... reasons cannot be here inserted ; on his arrival he entered into a long conversation with him respecting the danger of contagion, concluding at last with the remark, that something must be done to remedy the evil, and that the destruction of the sick...

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