The Syntax and Semantics of the Left Periphery

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Horst Lohnstein, Susanne Trissler
Walter de Gruyter, 2012 M04 17 - 529 pages
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The left periphery of clausal structures has been a prominent topic of research in generative linguistics during the last decades. Closer examination of its properties unfolds a rich array of perspectives like the status of barriers for extraction and government, the articulation of the topic focus structure, the fixation of wh-scope, the marking of clausal types, the interaction of syntactic structure with inflectional morphology as well as the determination of sentence mood and illocutionary force to mention just a few. The purpose of this book is to collect different and relevant studies in this field and to give a general overview of the various theoretical approaches concerned with morphological, syntactic and semantic properties together with the diachronic development of the left periphery.

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Contents

Theoretical developments of the left periphery
1
A diachronic perspective
23
Decomposing the left periphery Dialectal and crosslinguistic evidence
59
Headmovement in minimalism and V2 as FORCEmarking
97
In front of the prefield inside or outside the clause?
139
On the relation of whphrases and sentence mood in German
179
Notes on the syntax and the pragmatics of German Left Dislocation
203
Inflectional morphology and sentence mood in German
235
ET parasitic gaps and German clause structure
265
Verb position verbal mood and the anchoring potential of sentences
313
Nonstandard whquestions and alternative checkers in Pagotto
343
The particle li and the left periphery of Slavic yesno interrogatives
385
Tense person and mood under attitudes
431
Complementizer selection and the properties of complement clauses in German
489
Index
519
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About the author (2012)

Horst Lohnstein is researcher and Privatdozent at the University of Cologne, Germany.

Susanne Trissler is researcher at the University of Konstanz, Germany.

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