Edinburgh Magazine: Or Literary Miscellany, Volume 15

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J. Sibbald, 1800
 

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Page 18 - Though it cost the schoolmaster some thrashings, I made an excellent English scholar; and by the time I was ten or eleven years of age, I was a critic in substantives, verbs, and particles.
Page 22 - I had usually half a dozen or more pieces on hand; I took up one or other, as it suited the momentary tone of the mind, and dismissed the work as it bordered, on fatigue. My passions, when once lighted up, raged like so many devils, till they got vent in rhyme; and then the conning over my verses, like a spell, soothed all into quiet!
Page 167 - I cannot refift the temptation of relating feme particulars of his life. Having been adopted by an Hindoo devotee, and educated by him in the rigid tenets of his religion, he was yet young, when he commenced the courfe of his extraordinary mortifications.
Page 24 - ... of themselves. To know myself had been all along my constant study. I weighed myself alone ; I balanced myself with others ; I watched every means of information...
Page 22 - I had met with a collection of letters by the wits of Queen Anne's reign, and I pored over them most devoutly; I kept copies of any of my own letters that pleased me; and a comparison between them and the composition of most of my correspondents, flattered my vanity. I carried this whim so far, that though I had not three farthings...
Page 24 - I was pretty confident my poems would meet with some applause ; but at the worst, the roar of the Atlantic would deafen the voice of censure, and the novelty of West Indian scenes make me forget neglect.
Page 103 - I doubt not but the hard labour and sorrow of this period of his life was in a great measure the cause of that depression of spirits with which Robert was so often afflicted through his whole life afterwards. At this time he was almost constantly afflicted in the evenings with a dull headache, which at a future period of his life was exchanged for a palpitation of the heart, and a threatening of fainting and suffocation in his bed in the night-time.
Page 122 - ... less than a penny, to provide salt and firing to cook the rice. It will hardly be believed, that it was among their eager employments to...
Page 482 - PITT moved the order of the day, for the Houfe to refolve itfelf into a Committee of the whole Houfe to confider of Ways and Means for railing a fupply granted to His Majefty.

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