Outlines of geography, principally ancient [by J. Pillans].

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Adam and Charles Black, 1847 - 223 pages
 

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Page 94 - Ay me, I fondly dream ! Had ye been there for what could that have done ? What could the Muse herself that Orpheus bore, The Muse herself, for her enchanting son, Whom universal nature did lament, When by the rout that made the hideous roar, His gory visage down the stream was sent, Down the swift Hebrus to the Lesbian shore...
Page 110 - Yet not the more Cease I to wander where the muses haunt Clear spring or shady grove or sunny hill, Smit with the love of sacred song; but chief Thee, Sion, and the flowery brooks beneath That wash thy hallowed feet and warbling flow, Nightly I visit: nor sometimes forget Those other two, equalled with me in fate So were I equalled with them in renown, Blind Thamyris, and blind Maeonides, And Tiresias and Phineus prophets old.
Page 81 - The isles of Greece! the isles of Greece! Where burning Sappho loved and sung, Where grew the arts of war and peace, Where Delos rose, and Phoebus sprung! Eternal summer gilds them yet, But all, except their sun, is set.
Page 72 - Look once more ere we leave this specular mount Westward, much nearer by south-west, behold Where on the ^Egean shore a city stands Built nobly, pure the air, and light the soil ; Athens, the eye of Greece, mother of arts And eloquence...
Page 73 - The Oracles are dumb ; No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance, or breathed spell, Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Page 34 - He scarce had ceased, when the superior fiend Was moving toward the shore: his ponderous shield, Ethereal temper, massy, large, and round, Behind him cast; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views, At evening, from the top of Fesole, Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe.
Page 105 - The Scian and the Teian muse, The hero's harp, the lover's lute, Have found the fame your shores refuse : Their place of birth alone is mute To sounds which echo further west Than your sires'
Page 83 - Where erst was thickest fight, the angelic throng, And left large field, unsafe within the wind Of such commotion; such as, to set forth Great things by small, if, Nature's concord broke, Among the constellations war were sprung, Two planets, rushing from aspect malign Of fiercest opposition, in mid sky Should combat, and their jarring spheres confound.
Page 48 - Alpheum fama est hue Elidis amnem Occultas egisse vias subter mare : qui nunc Ore, Arethusa, tuo Siculis confunditur undis.
Page 21 - The grand object of travelling is to see the shores of the Mediterranean. On those shores were the four great Empires of the world ; the Assyrian, the Persian, the Grecian, and the Roman. All our religion, almost all our law, almost all our arts, almost all that sets us above savages, has come to us from the shores of the Mediterranean.

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