Account of the Life and Writings of Thomas Reid...

Front Cover
Bell & Bradfute, 1803 - 164 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 80 - There is no question of importance whose decision is not comprised in the science of Man, and there is none which can be decided with any certainty before we become acquainted with that science.
Page 68 - The intense view of these manifold contradictions and imperfections in human reason has so wrought upon me, and heated my brain, that I am ready to reject all belief and reasoning, and can look upon no opinion even as more probable or likely than another.
Page 175 - By the loss of my bosom-friend, with whom I lived fifty-two years, I am brought into a kind of new world, at a time of life when old habits are not easily forgot, or new ones acquired. But every world is God's world, and I am thankful for the comforts he has left me. Mrs. Carmichael has now the care of two , old deaf men, and does every thing in her power to please them ; and both are very sensible of her goodness.
Page 78 - If therefore the sciences of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Natural Religion, have such a dependence on the knowledge of man, what may be expected in the other sciences, whose connexion with human nature is more close and intimate ? The sole end of logic is to explain the principles...
Page 174 - A short extract from a letter addressed to myself by Dr. Reid, not many weeks after his wife's death, will, I am persuaded, be acceptable to many, as an interesting relic of the writer. " By the loss of my bosom-friend, with whom I lived fiftytwo years, I am brought into a kind of new world, at a time of life when old habits are not easily forgot, or new ones acquired. But every world is God's world, and I am thankful for the comforts he has left me.
Page 143 - I have here advanced, that I mean to offer an apology for those, who, either in physics or morals, would presumptuously state their own opinions with respect to the laws of nature, as a bar against future attempts to simplify and generalize them still farther. To assert, that none of the mechanical explanations yet given of gravitation are satisfactory...
Page 27 - Powers, he acknowledges, that, in his youth, he had, without examination, admitted the established opinions on which Mr. Hume's system of scepticism was raised ; and that it was the consequences which these opinions seemed to involve which roused his suspicions concerning their truth.
Page 33 - I shall only say, that if you have been able to clear up these abstruse and important subjects, instead of being mortified, I shall be so vain as to pretend to a share of the praise ; and shall think, that my errors, by having at least some coherence, had led you to make a more strict review of my principles, which were the common ones, and to perceive their futility.
Page 167 - Beautiful.' philosophy of the mind, abstracting entirely from that pre-eminence which belongs to it in consequence of its practical applications, may claim a distinguished rank among those preparatory disciplines, which . another writer of equal talents has happily compared to " the crops which are raised, not for the sake of the harvest, but to be ploughed in as a dressing to the land.
Page 170 - As they were occasioned, therefore," he adds, " by the infirmities of age, they will, I hope be heard with the greater indulgence." Among the various occupations with which he thus enlivened his retirement, the mathematical pursuits of his earlier years held a distinguished place. He delighted to converse about them with his friends ; and often exercised his skill in the investigation of particular problems. His knowledge of ancient geometry had not probably been, at any time, very...

Bibliographic information