Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Volume 35

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Page 364 - And hardly do we guess aright at things that are upon earth, and with labour do we find the things that are before us: but the things that are in heaven who hath searched out?
Page 2 - And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth : and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born.
Page 309 - Under whatever aspect we view this cranium, whether we regard its vertical depression, the enormous thickness of its supraciliary ridges, its sloping occiput, or its long and straight squamosal suture, we meet with ape-like characters, stamping it as the most pithecoid of human crania yet discovered.
Page 2 - And there was seen another sign in heaven ; and behold, a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and upon his heads seven diadems.
Page 13 - ... rather than astronomers must tell us. For a long time it was accepted without hesitation that these bodies required great heat for their first consolidation. Their resemblance to the earth's volcanic rocks was insisted on by mineralogists. Professor J. Lawrence Smith, in 1855, asserted, without reserve, that " they have all been subject to a more or less prolonged igneous action corresponding to that of terrestrial volcanoes.
Page 30 - Winchell, and Dr. Persifor Frazer (as appears by the official record of the permanent secretary). By some misfortune, Prof. Winchell's appointment was not known to the members of the American Committee until the report to be alluded to later was printed, so that his name does not appear in the list of members of the committee, as it should, on page two of the report. As soon as the secretary learned the facts, he printed an extra leaf containing Prof. Winchell's name and the reason for its nonappearance...
Page 322 - Perthes had startled the civilized world, that is, somewhere between six thousand and ten thousand years ago. And this man who thus appeared was not a being of feeble powers, a dullwitted savage, on the mental level of the degenerate Australian or Hottentot of our day. He possessed and manifested, from the first, intellectual faculties of the highest order, such as none of his descendants have surpassed. His speech, we may be sure, was not a mere mumble of disjointed sounds, framed of interjections...
Page 28 - The Government of the United States and the Governments of the several States stand ready to cooperate.
Page 1 - ... and the stars of the heaven fell unto the earth, as a fig tree casteth her unripe figs, when she is shaken of a great wind.
Page 226 - XXXV. 15 easiest ways of yielding to the crush was by a little slipping of slab on slab. whereby their inclination should steepen and their horizontal measure de^crease. If the crushing were more severe near the surface than at great depths, a shearing force would be introduced that might, if necessary, throw the slabs over past the vertical and thus produce reversed dips. As slab slips on slab, the formerly horizontal bevelled surface of every one is canted over so as to dip in one direction at...

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