Lough Derg and Its Pilgrimages: With Map and Illustrations

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J. Dollard, 1879 - 208 pages

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Page 101 - Eme, and the representative of a bishop for fifteen years before his death. He was a precious stone, a bright gem, a luminous star, a treasury of wisdom, and a fruitful branch of the canon, and a fountain of charity, meekness, and mildness ; a dove in purity of heart, and a turtle in chastity...
Page 120 - ... who paid eight pence each for admission to the island. Sir William further informs the Privy Council, that in order to hinder the seduced people from going any longer to this stronghold of Purgatory, and wholly to take away the abuse hereafter, he had directed the whole to be defaced and utterly demolished ; therefore the walls, works, foundations, vaults, &c. , he ordered to be rooted up, also the place called St. Patrick's bed, and the stone on which he knelt. These and all other superstitious...
Page 135 - Patrick's purgatory in the county of Donegal and of wells, to which pilgrimages are made by vast numbers at certain seasons, by which not only the peace of the public is greatly disturbed, but the safety of the government also hazarded, by the riotous and unlawful assembling together of many...
Page 84 - twas lonely, As if the loved tenant lay dead; Ah, would it were death, and death only ! But no, the young false one had fled. And there hung the lute that could soften My very worst...
Page 178 - ... to give the slightest interest to the scene. The lake is considered to be about nine miles in circumference. As I descended towards the shore of the lake, I could see that the island, which is not quite a mile from the shore, was entirely covered with persons; and on the bank, which I soon reached, I found upwards of two hundred pilgrims waiting to be ferried over. They were generally respectably dressed. Some were sitting, some lying on the grass ; some, more impatient, were standing close to...
Page 135 - ... of wells, to which pilgrimages are made by vast numbers at certain seasons, by which, not only the peace of the public is greatly disturbed, but the safety of the government also hazarded by the riotous and unlawful assembling together of many thousands of papists to the said wells and other places: be it further enacted that all such meetings and assemblies shall be deemed and adjudged riots and unlawful assemblies, and punishable as such, in all or any persons meeting at such places as is aforesaid.
Page 193 - Come not nigh hither, put off the shoes from thy feet :* for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground.
Page 28 - Prior to those of the twelfth century we find very few monuments of ecclesiastical architecture in Ireland. This is not to be wondered at, because the general fashion of the country was to erect their buildings of wood, a fashion, which in great part continues to this day in several parts of Europe. As consequently their churches also were usually built of wood, it cannot be expected that there should be any remains of such churches at present.
Page 77 - ... service of the Church, such as practised by the secular clergy, with the observance of monastic regulations, which, although varying more or less, were, as I have often remarked, founded on the system, which St. Patrick had seen followed in Lerins and at Tours, and which he introduced into Ireland.

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