Medical Press and Circular, Volume 90

Front Cover
1885

From inside the book

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 139 - Every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you; even as the green herb have I given you all things. But flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall ye not eat.
Page 273 - Fund was founded in 1902, under the direction of the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and is governed by representatives of many medical and scientific institutions.
Page 139 - And the fear of you, and the dread of you, shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air...
Page 117 - The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion (either as being the received opinion or as being agreeable to itself) draws all things else to support and agree with it. And though there be a greater number and weight of instances to be found on the other side, yet these it either neglects and despises, or else by some distinction sets aside and rejects; in order that by this great and pernicious predetermination the authority of its former conclusions may remain inviolate.
Page 141 - Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake, and thine often infirmities.
Page 21 - PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN, I thank you most sincerely for the honour you have done me in appointing me to deliver the Lettsomian Lectures before you this year. The subject I have chosen is one of much practical interest, but it is of such extent that, to deal with it completely, in a course of three lectures, is obviously impossible. I have already discussed the physiological processes of digestion at considerable length...
Page 94 - Some feverish excitement, with the palms of the hands and soles of the feet dry and parched, especially in the evening, is often present in severe cases. In temper they are irritable and excitable ; in men the sexual power is generally deficient, and often absent. A severe and constant pain, or sense of weight across the loins, is generally a prominent symptom, with, often, some amount of irritability of the bladder. The mental faculties are generally but slightly affected, loss of memory being sometimes...
Page 114 - Nature, for the perfect digestion of which a definite quantity of gastric juice is furnished by the proper gastric apparatus. But to effect this most agreeable of all sensations and conditions the real Elysian satisfaction of the reasonable epicure timely attention must be paid to the preliminary processes, such as thorough mastication and moderate or slow deglutition. These are indispensable to the due and natural supply of the stomach at the stated periods of alimentation ; for if food...
Page 117 - The human understanding is no dry light, but receives an infusion from the will and affections; whence proceed sciences which may be called
Page 310 - ... two veins, which lay on the right side of the bodies of the vertebrae; the superior of these two received the sixth, seventh, and eighth intercostal veins; the inferior collected the blood from the ninth, tenth, and eleventh intercostal spaces. The left azygos, thus formed, attained to the size of an ordinary azygos major; it crossed the junction of the transverse and descending portions of the aortic arch, and opened into the left innominate vein. A small vein opened in the ordinary position...

Bibliographic information