Asian and Jungian Views of Ethics

Front Cover
Carl B. Becker
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - 146 pages


More than fifty years ago, Tetsuhiko Uehiro looked down on the radioactive ashes of Hiroshima and dedicated his life to more ethical resolutions of human disagreements. He founded an association which attracted millions of Japanese people, to promote traditional ethics. His son, Eiji Uehiro, seeking a more universal and international basis for ethics, founded the Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education, which became a partner of the Carnegie Council. To commemorate the Foundation's tenth anniversary, leading scholars of Asian philosophy and Jungian psychology were brought together to find new grounds for ethics in human experience which would not depend on religious affiliation and which would apply ethics to the interpersonal and global problems of the modern world.

All the authors reach for new decision-making paradigms giving new ways of learning about morality. They suggest that our bodies, feelings, dreams, and synchronous experiences give us clues to ethics. Their scholarship illusrates that people are invisibly, inescapably interconnected with each other and with our environment. An important resource for scholars in the fields of comparative cultures, counseling and ethics, Jungian psychology, and Asian religions.

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Contents

II
1
III
9
VI
43
VII
65
IX
85
XI
113
XII
135
XIII
137
XIV
145
Copyright

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Page 14 - The oracles are dumb, No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving.
Page 101 - A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.
Page 15 - Me miserable! which way shall I fly Infinite wrath and infinite despair? Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell; 75 And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep Still threat'ning to devour me opens wide, To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.
Page 96 - ... eye" of the net, and since the net itself is infinite in dimension, the jewels are infinite in number. There hang the jewels, glittering like stars of the first magnitude, a wonderful sight to behold. If we now arbitrarily select one of these jewels for inspection and look closely at it, we will discover that in its polished surface there are reflected all the other jewels in the net, infinite in number. Not only that, but each of the jewels reflected in this one jewel is also reflecting all...
Page 101 - In short, a land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens from conqueror of the land-community to plain member and citizen of it.
Page 93 - Right Understanding, Right Thought, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration.
Page 59 - A Satyagrahi obeys the laws of society intelligently and of his own free will, because he considers it to be his sacred duty to do so. It is only when a person has thus obeyed the laws of society scrupulously that he is in a position to judge as to which particular rules are good and just and which unjust and iniquitous. Only then does the right accrue to him of the civil disobedience of certain laws in well-defined circumstances.
Page 36 - Christianity for the one purpose of making the cult and the sacred myth what they once were - a drunken feast of joy where man regained the ethos and holiness of an animal. That was the beauty and purpose of classical religion, which from God knows what temporary biological needs has turned into a Misery Institute.
Page 103 - When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.

About the author (1999)

CARL B. BECKER is Professor of Comparative Thought at Kyoto University and Research Associate at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies. A specialist in medical ethics, healing traditions, and religious experience, his earlier publications include Breaking the Circle: Death and Afterlife in Buddhism and At the Border of Death.

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