The History of Greece, Volume 3

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T. Bedlington and C. Ewer, 1823
 

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Page 122 - With orient colours waving: with them rose A forest huge of spears; and thronging helms Appear'd, and serried shields, in thick array, Of depth immeasurable. Anon they move In perfect phalanx, to the Dorian mood Of flutes and soft recorders...
Page 284 - Syracusan people condemned both to death, and they were executed. In the ancient democracies the most worthless individual, touching at any time a chord in consonance with popular passion, could procure the sanction of sovereign authority for any villany. For where neither one person nor a select body was responsible, but the whole people, truly despotic, were the common authors of every public act, the shame of flagitious measures was so divided that it was disregarded.
Page 194 - Alcibiades, his magnificence, his ambition, his unprincipled conduct, and his various extravagancies, were made constant subjects of public conversation. His abilities, at the same time, and even his virtues, were compared to those by which the Peisistratids had acquired the tyranny. The severities which had occasioned the expulsion of those celebrated tyrants were then magnified tenfold ; the execration to which their memory had been...
Page 316 - Athenians elate with their success, proceedi. 8. c. 26. e(j tnen immediately to take measures for an assault upon Miletus ; but, in the evening of the same day on which the battle was fought, intelligence arrived of the approach of a fleet from Peloponnesus, of fifty-five triremes. Onomacles and Scironidas, anxious to restore the naval reputation of Athens, and perhaps too fearful of the temper of the people, their soverein, to use their judgement with due calmness, proposed to await the enemy's...
Page 194 - ... ships. The fleet proceeding then to Catana, found there the Salaminian, the ship appropriated to purposes of sacred and solemn office, bearing an order from the Athenian people for the immediate return of Alcibiades and some other officers to Athens, to answer accusations preferred against them for mutilating the statues and profaning the mysteries. Since the armament sailed for Sicily, Athens had been experiencing the worst evils of democratical frenzy. The...
Page 338 - ... signifying sworn brotherhoods. The objects proposed were principally two ; private security and political power; and for the sake of one or both of these, most men of rank or substance in Athens were members of some Synomosy. Against the oppression of democratical despotism, which was often, as we shall see more particularly hereafter, very severely exercised against the rich, the collected influence of a body of noble and wealthy citizens might give protection, when the most respectable individual,...
Page 327 - ... to restore himself to his country, before that country was reduced so low as to be not worth returning to. With this view he had courted .the satrap assiduously and successfully. Neither the interest of the Persian empire, nor the satrap's interest, were any more than his own, the same with that' of Lacedaemon or the Peloporinesian confederacy.
Page 451 - Thus encouraged, Lyciscus, one of the leading men, declared, ' that whoever should ' presume to check the authority of the assembly, he would move that his fate should be decided by the ' same ballot with that of the generals.' The assembly upon this was again in uproar. Euryptolemus feared, by irritating the multitude, to injure the cause he meant to defend, and, retracting his proposed citation of Callixenus, declared his submission to the will of the people.
Page 341 - Lacedaemon, a treaty was concluded in the plain of the Maeander, between the Lacedaemonians and their allies on one part, and Tissaphernes and Hieramenes and the sons of Pharnaces on the other part, concerning the affairs of the king and those of the Lacedaemonians and their allies. " Whatever the king possesses in Asia shall be the king's, and the king shall direct the affairs of his own country according to his will and pleasure. The Lacedaemonians and their allies shall not injure any place within...
Page 269 - Syracusans approached, and a more obstinate battle ensued. Meanwhile the Athenian army stood on the shore, observing with the most anxious attention what passed, within such a distance that they could see and hear almost every thing. When therefore after a long contest, with various fortune at times in various parts, the advantage of the Syracusans became decisive, and the whole Athenian fleet fled pursued, then grief, indignation, and dismay (says the eloquent historian, at a loss for words equal...

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