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TABLE III. SORTING RESULTS FOR 1924 CROP. TOTAL Weight OF GRADES AND LENGTHS IN OUNCES.

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In the above table the brokes include poor quality tobacco (better than fillers) such as variegated, mixed, and off colors, also broken leaves and other damaged tobacco.

The tops include short darks, 16' or less, and poor quality long darks. Leaves in the class called darks probably are not of wrapper quality but are of heavy body and dark color. No light or medium wrappers were found in sufficient amount to make separate weighings, therefore they are included in the seconds or the darks.

TABLE IV.

Sorting RESULTS FOR 1924 Crop. PERCENTAGE OF GRADE:.

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Ni
N1*
N1**
Ave.
N2.
N2*,
N2*

1
1.0

6
4.3

4.3

16
15

16
15.7

19
11

16
15.3

23

4

I
1

1
1.0

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Ave. %

14.0

3.0

4.0

9

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5

18

9

11
12.7
10

9
15
11.4

15
4

9
9.3

17
13

12
14.0

17
4

6
9.0
12

0
1
1
7
0
1
0
3

VONO CON NOSNO CON

0
0

0
0.0

2.0

19
16.7

14
15

15
14.7

4.7

1
1

1
1.0

N3.
N3*
N3**
Ave. 6
N4.
N4*
N4*
Ave.
N5.
N5*
N5**
Ave.
N6.
N6*
NO**
Ave. %
N7.
N7*
N7**
Ave, %

0
0

0
0.0

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3.3

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

4.7

6

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1
1

1
1.0

0
0

0
0.0

CO

13
12.0
12

9

17
12.7

14
18

12
14.7

12
4
1

38.0

19
38

34
30.3

37
30

30
32.3

20
14

7
13.6

O
0

0
0.0

2.3

9.7

1.7

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5.0

6.0

1.3

The above results indicate that the use of inorganic compounds (such as ammonium sulfate and nitrates) as the only sources of applied ammonia tends to produce increased percentages of the lower grades of tobacco, included largely in the brokes and the tops. This is accompanied by a decrease in the percentage of the more desirable grades especially the seconds.

During sorting, samples were taken from the darks and the seconds which were pooled March 14, 1925, on the basis of color and general quality by Mr. Walter Edwards, official grader for the Connecticut Valley Tobacco Association. Applying 1923 prices, average prices per pound and per acre were computed. The price per pound of the different grades of tobacco grown on the different plots is given in Table V.

TABLE V. SCHEDULE OF PRICES PER POUND.

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Price per lb. on basis of pooling and 1923 prices
Darks

Light seconds
Brks. 16-18" 18-20' 20-30" 14-16' 16-18 18-300
20 17 27 4272 30 45 72
20 17 27

30 45

72 20 17 27

45 72

10
10

15 15 15

4212 422

10

30

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Considering the percentage of the different grades as decimal parts of a pound and applying the pool prices, an average price per pound was figured for each plot. After deducting il cents per pound for sorting, sweating, storage and overhead (the Association charge for the 1923 crop) the net return per pound is presented in Table VI.

TABLE VI. SUMMARY OF RESULTS FOR 1924 ON NITROGEN Plots.

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$94.65 $174.17

12 mineral N.

(Nitr, soda and
amm, sulf.)

N2**

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Ave. N3 13*

All min. N. (Nitr.

soda and amm.
sulf.)

N3**

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12 Min. N. (Nitr.

pot. and amm.
sulfate)

1,307
1,387
1,493
1,396
1,360
1,307
1,387
1,351
1,387
1,440
1,387
1,405
1,333
1,440
1,467
1,413
1,280
1,360
1,360
1,333
1,440
1,413
1,360
1,404
1,413
1,440
1,440
1,431

22.04 $288.06
16.30 226.08
19.58 292.33
19.31 268.82
18.05 245.48
18.10 236.57
22.43 311.10
19.53 264.38
18.31 253.96
13.67 196.85
20.02 277.68
17.33 242.83
15.18 203.46
16.56 238.46
15.26 223.25
15.67 221.72
7.68 98.30
6.90 93.84
6.53 88.80
7.04 93.65
20.63 297.07
17.42 246.14
17.05 231.88
18.37 258.36
13.22 186.80
16.63 239.47
21.47 309.17
17.11 244.81

79.37

Ave.
*14
N4*
N4**
Ave.
*N5
N5*
N5**
Ave.
N6
N6*
N6**
Ave.
N7
N7*
N7**
Ave.

142.35

All min. N. (Nitr.

pot. and amm.
sulf.)

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12 Nitrogen in D.

Gr. fish

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12 Nitrogen in fine

tankage

86.19

138.62

SUMMARY OF THREE YEARS EXPERIMENTS ON NITROGEN RATION.

In summarizing the results of the first three years of these tests, it must be kept in mind that the experiments are not yet complete and any tentative decisions drawn may be reversed by results of the experiments of 1925 or subsequent years. Also it must be remembered that only one of the three years was a normal tobacco year, viz., 1923. The season of 1922 was unusually wet while 1924 was abnormally dry. It is conceivable that the results in a normal year might be different.

1 Ave. yield for 3 years.

* -Through a mistake which was not discovered until after the conclusion of these experiments plots N4 and 15 were treated with a low grade nitrate of potash (18% NH; and 12.76% K,0) instead of a high grade (15% NH; and 43.4% K,0) as was considered in working out the formula. The total amount of ammonia added to N4 was 275.6 lbs. and the potash was reduced to 106.5 lbs. per acre. Plot N5 likewise had the ammonia increased to 277.4 lbs. and the K,0 reduced to 70.4. It is quite certain this mistake also occurred in 1923. For this reason, the results obtained on these two plots in 1923 and 1924 are of doubtful significance.

Nevertheless with the preceding reservations in mind, let us see what tentative answer can be made to the questions proposed on page 4.

1. Can all the nitrogen be supplied from mineral sources? In answering this question it is best to disregard, for the reason previously stated, the plots on which nitrate of potash was used. Thus the question really is: Can all of the nitrogen be supplied from a mixture of nitrate of soda and sulfate of ammonia. This may be answered by comparing plots N1 (basal ration) with N3 (all nitrogen in sulfate of ammonia and nitrate of soda). The average yield of the N1 plots for the three years was 1,520 lbs. and for N3 was 1,573 lbs., showing thus a small increase in weight of cured leaves. In 1922 the quality of tobacco raised on N3 was rated poor as compared with N1 rated excellent. The sorting records for 1923 do not show that the N3 tobacco was inferior to N1. In 1924 the average price of the N1 tobacco was 2c. per pound higher than N3. When, however, this is balanced against the reduced cost of the fertilizer used on N3, the net return to the grower was only 90c. per acre less than where the more expensive fertilizer was used. However, since the quality was undoubtedly inferior during two out of the three years it would seem best for the grower to avoid the entire substitution of mineral sources of nitrogen and keep up the quality of the tobacco even though the immediate net return is no larger.

2. Can one half of the nitrogen be supplied from sulfate of ammonia and nitrate of soda? This question may be answered by comparing the records of the N1 plots with the N2 plots. The average yield on the N2 plots was 70 lbs. per acre less than the N1 plots for the three years. In 1922 the N2 tobacco was rated as "fair in quality" compared with Nl rated "excellent". On the other hand the sorting records of 1923 show somewhat better quality in N2 than in N1. The average price for the 1924 crop was practically the same for N1 and N2. The sorting records indicate about the same quality. The net return for the N2 tobacco was $5.56 per acre greater than for the Ni tobacco in 1924 because of the reduced price of the fertilizer. In answer to the question then we may say that the results during 3 years of tests indicate that mineral carriers of nitrogen may be used to advantage to supply one half of the ammonia.

3. Can one half of the nitrogen be supplied to advantage in dry ground fish? This may be answered by comparison of the records of the N1 and the N6 plots. The average yield of the N6 plots for the three years was 1,571 lbs. as compared with 1,520 lbs. for the N1 plots. In 1922 the quality of the two was rated the same. In 1923, N6 had more light wrappers, more seconds, fewer fillers and brokes and much longer fire-holding capacity than N1. In 1924 the average price of the N6 tobacco was about 1 cent less

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