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SOILS.

Mr. M. F. Morgan in charge. 1. Utilizations and Fertilizer Requiremonts of Important Soil Types of Connecticut. Previous intensive studies of soil conditions and land utilization in Lebanon yielded data which was studied in relation to the economic survey conducted by the department of Rural Economics of the Connecticut Agricultural College. It was found that, in the above town, the area in which the Charlton series of soil occurred, was markedly superior as a dairy region to the other portions of the town where Gloucester fine sandy loam, Gloucester stony fine sandy loam and the Merrimac series were the principal soils. Interesting relationships of soils to land cover were also manifested.

These results having shown the necessity for further study in regions where somewhat different soil conditions occurred, the areas of Wilton, Goshen, Middletown, Pomfret, Eastford and Stonington were surveyed during the field season. The use of airplane photographs materially aided the study of land utilization and accurate mapping of soil type areas in the town of Middletown.

A lack of uniformity of soil conditions was found in the areas studied during the 1924 field season but certain soil types were shown to be fairly constant in their characteristics wherever found.

Land utilization studies as tabulated thus far bear out the fact that soils such as the Gloucester stony fine sandy loam, are of value chiefly for forestry and recreational sites, those similar to the Charlton loam are particularly adapted to dairying; while soils like the Merrimac sandy loam are peculiarly adapted to potatoes, intensive trucking and vegetable gardening.

The need for a thorough soil and land utilization survey becomes more and more apparent as the results of the present studies are considered.

Sub Project A Soil Survey and Land Cover Studies of Selected Areas in Connecticut. This project has taken three phases of development: (1) Completion of maps and data incident to the soil-land cover and economic survey of Lebanon town, (2) Detailed land cover and soil type studies in the towns of Wilton, Goshen, Middletown, Pomfret, Eastford and Stonington, (3) Tabulation of data on these areas to show distribution of cover on the more important soil types.

Sub Project B-Pot Experiments on Effects of Fertilization of Important Soil Types. Pot experiments with 12 soil types of Connecticut, using alfalfa and buckwheat to show the effects of Lime, Nitrogen and Phosphorus, and these plus Potassium, show wide differences in fertility of untreated soils and in relative

responses to treatment. Sixteen samples of soil have been collected for further experiment.

Sub Project C-Soil Reaction Studies. Samples of various horizons of most of the soil types represented in each area studied in sub-project A have been collected for studies in lime requirement, h-ion concentration, and soluble aluminum compounds.

Sub Project D-Mechanical Analyses of Important Soil Types. Similar samples have been collected for this experiment in determination of mechanical analyses by U. S. Bureau of Soils and Harlan Jonson's method, and determination of colloidal material.

Sub Project E-Studies of Forest Adaptations of Important Soil Types. This experiment has two phases: (1) Identification of soil types on plots upon which forestry department made detailed studies of stands and associations, (2) Collections of seven soil types upon which studies are to be made of growth of seedlings of forest species in pot experiments.

Sub Project F-Chemical Analyses and Reaction Studies of Particular Pasture Soils. Soil samples have been collected from 25 pasture demonstration fields located in various parts of the state to determine the total Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium and Magnesium and the reaction of all samples.

TOBACCO SUB-STATION AT WINDSOR. The sudden resignation of Mr. C. M. Slagg on March 1, made necessary a restriction of the Service work possible during the season of 1924. The experimental program, however, went forward without interruption. A very elaborate new project was launched, having as its object the improvement of the several types of Broadleaf and Havana now recognized among growers. A large number of so-called strains of each type were grown at Windsor and on plots scattered about the various type districts. These will be continued next year. Experiments under way may be listed: 1. Fertilizer Experiments

a. Sources of Nitrogen.
b. Ratio of Phosphoric Acid.
c. Sources of Potash.

d. Fractional Applications.
PS!, e. Manure (New York and cow (steer) compared

with hone). f. Magnesium, Chlorine and Sulfur. (U. S. D. A.). 2. Varietal Improvement a... Strain trials of Broadleaf, Havana and Cuban as a

basis for future improvement.

C.

e.

a.

b. Tests of crosses made by Dr.Jones. : 1
Round tip cultural experiments to improve

quality.
d. Trials for “foreign" or new types.

N. rustica as a source of nicotine.
3. Curing Experiments.
Lack of land for growing material prevented the carry-

ing out of these as planned. 4. Diseases.

Tests of Control Measures for Wildfire. b. Brown Root Rot (U. S. D. A.).

C. Black Root Rot, the effect of soil treatments. Except as noted, the above program was carried out in spite of the fact that the position of superintendent was not filled. The weather was extremely dry and a partial crop failure resulted. At this time it is too early to estimate the results, the crop not being sorted.

A Field Day was held at the farm on August 5, about 400 persons attending. An excellent lunch was served by the ladies of a local church. A program for the day, held in the new shed, was a unique feature.

List of Publications Available for Distribution.

CROPS 150. Clover Seed in the Connecticut Market 180. Studies on the Tobacco Crop of Connecticut 191. Tests of Soy Beans, 1915 192. Observations on Alfalfa 193. Tests of Soy Beans, 1916 228. Connecticut Round-Tip Tobacco 259. Corn in Connecticut

FEEDING STUFFS 138. Commercial Feeding Stuffs in the Connecticut Market 141. Commercial Feeding Stuffs in the Connecticut Market 206. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1917 212. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1918 221. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1919 229. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1920 238. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1921 249. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1922 257. Report on Commercial Feeding Stuffs, for 1923

FERTILIZERS 156. Cotton Seed Meal As a Fertilizer 170. The Trade in Cotton Seed Meal 194. Manure from the Sea 198. Domestic Supplies of Potash 204. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1917 209. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1918 217. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1919 223. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1920 233. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1921 241. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1922 250. Report on Commercial Fertilizers, for 1923

FOOD AND DRUG PRODUCTS 200. Report on Food and Drug Products, for 1917 210. Report on Food and Drug Products, for 1918 219. Report on Food and Drug Products, for 1919 227. Report on Food and Drug Products, for 1920 236. Report on Food and Drug Products, for 1921 248. Report on Food and Drug Products, for 1922 255. Report on Food Products and Drugs, for 1923

FOODS

201. Food Fats and Oils
213. Condensed Milk, Malted Milk, Milk Powder
215. The Food Value of Milk
220. Report on Diabetic Foods
240. Commercial Vitamine Preparations

FORESTRY 231. Report of the Tree Protection Examining Board 253. Better Forests for Connecticut

INSECTS

155. The Elm Leaf Beetle
169. The Leopard Moth
177. The Apple Tree Tent Caterpillar
182. The Brown-Tail Moth
186. The Gypsy Moth
195. Insects Injuring Stored Food Products in Connecticut
203. Report of the Entomologist, for 1917
211. Report of the Entomologist, for 1918
218. Report of the Entomologist, for 1919
225. A Study of the Bulb Mite.
226. Report of the Entomologist, for 1920
230. The Grass-Feeding Frog-Hopper or Spittle-Bug
231. Report of the Tree Protection Examining Board
242. Report on Commercial Insecticides and Fungicides, 1922
245.

Results of Dusting vs. Spraying in Connecticut Apple and Peach

Orchards in 1922 246.

The Apple and Thorn Skeletonizer 247. Report of the Entomologist, for 1922 251. The Raspberry Fruit Worm 252. The European Red Mite 256. Twenty-third Report of the State Entomologist (1923) 258. Report on Insecticides and Fungicides (1923)

PLANT DISEASES 214. Report of Botanist, for 1917 and 1918 222. New or Unusual Plant Injuries and Diseases Found in Connecticut

1916-1919 231. Report of the Tree Protection Examining Board 237. Control of the White Pine Blister Rust in Connecticut 239. Wildfire of Tobacco in Connecticut 242. Report on Commercial Insecticides and Fungicides, 1922 245. Results of Dusting vs. Spraying in Connecticut Apple and Peach

Orchards in 1922 258. Report on Insecticides and Fungicides (1923)

POULTRY 202. An Experience in Keeping Poultry in the City

REPORTS OF DIRECTOR

232. Report of the Director for the Year Ending October 31, 1921 243. Report of the Director for the Year Ending October 31, 1922 254. Report of the Director for the Year Ending October 31, 1923 264. Report of the Director for the Year Ending October 31, 1924

REPORTS Beginning with the year 1877 and ending with 1916 the Station issued Annual Reports. Of these the following are out of print: 1877-1880 inclu. sive, 1882, 1883, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1889-1892 inclusive, 1895-1906* inclusive.

Commencing with the year 1917, the annual reports include all regular bulletins; they are issued in parts and each part bears a bulletin number.

*Of some other reports the Station has but a limited number, which are reserved to complete library sets.

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