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WESTERN DISTRICT.

(Miss Berger in charge.) Towns worked in: Bridgeport 21 Stamford

5 Danbury 5 Stratford

2 Greenwich 2 Trumbull

1 Milford 2 Westport

1 New Milford 4 New Canaan

1 Norwalk ...

5 Total number of towns, 11; total number of pupils, 49. Grand total number of towns, 56; grand total number of pupils, 187.

In addition to the work of the district teachers as shown above, a few pupils were served for the year ended June 30, 1924, by other employes of the Board, as follows: Hartford 1 Meriden 1 New Milford

1 Hartland 1 New Haven 4 Simsbury

1 Total number of towns, 6; total number of pupils, 9.

The grand totals of the above for the year ended June 30, 1924, are: Total number of towns

62 Total number of pupils

196 The 100 towns in which the home teachers did work investigating, calling or teaching for the year ended June 30, 1924, are: Ansonia

Ellington New Britain Stonington
Ashford
Enfield

New Canaan Stratford
Avon
Essex

New Hartford Thompson
Berlin

Farmington New Haven Tolland
Bethlehem Glastonbury Newington Torrington
Bozrah
Granby

New London Trumbull
Branford Greenwich New Milford Vernon
Bridgeport Griswold North Stonington Wallingford
Bristol
Groton
Norwalk

Washinton
Brooklyn Guilford

Norwich

Waterbury Burlington Hamden

Plainfield

Waterford Canterbury Hampton Plainville Watertown Canton

Hartford Plymouth West Hartford Clinton Hartland Portland

West Haven
Colchester Harwinton Putnam

Westport
Columbia
Hebron

Ridgefield Wethersfield
Coventry Killingly Simsbury Willington
Danbury
Madison
Roxbury

Wilton
Durham
Manchester Salem

Winchester
Eastford
Mansfield Seymour

Windham
East Granby Meriden

Shelton

Windsor East Haddam Middletown Southbury Wolcott East Hampton Milford

Stafford

Woodbridge East Haven Montville Stamford

Woodbury East Lyme Naugatuck Sterling

Woodstock

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SALES SERVICE

The sales service, which is an outgrowth of the home teaching work, has grown rapidly. An additional room has been assigned us at the State Capitol where we keep our stock and manufactured articles. The output of the blind in their homes has increased to such an extent that we feel that it will be necessary to secure someone as sales manager to devote her full time to this effort, and one of our Connecticut young women who has partial vision is now receiving training in this field in Pennsylvania and Ohio, in hope that we will be able to give her a position when she is ready to accept employment.

When one recalls that more than 60 per cent of the blind people in the state are over 50 years of age, it becomes evident to what extent the problem of blindness is interwoven with that of old age.

Most of these men and women are too old or too infirm to leave their homes to go to an institution to learn a trade. They welcome the opportunity to do work in their homes, but a chief difficulty is to find a market for their goods. Because of their lack of sight, and meagre knowledge as to how to go about it, they cannot dispose of any continued output of the articles which they can make.

This Board voted, therefore, at a meeting March 27, 1922, to set aside $500 from the Relief Fund to establish a revolving fund to start this work. The plan was for the home teachers to instruct the blind people in handwork and for the Board to collect the articles which were made and to arrange for sales at church fairs, city and state expositions, at department stores and in town halls or other central places in small localities. The full price which was obtained for an article was to be paid to the blind person who made it, while the overhead expense of selling it was to be borne by the Board. In this way the blind person would be relieved of the worry and expense of selling what he had made, and would be paid the price for which it would be retailed in a store.

In the two years covered by this report the worth of the effort has been demonstrated. For the fiscal year 1923 the sales amounted to $2017.37 and for the year 1924, $3326.14. All of this money was given to the blind people whose articles were sold. Miss Ivie M. Mead, one of our home teachers, has rendered additional service during this period by purchasing most of the materials used in the work. She has sent the goods to the other teachers as there has been call for them and this has entailed labor and responsibility which she has contributed cheerfully and efficiently.

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the courtesy and consideration which has been extended the Board and its workers by clubs, church organizations and business houses, for we realize that the work could not have been accomplished but for the cooperation we have had from these sources.

49

The report of the sales for the year ended June 30, 1923, is as follows:

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Unity Church
Besse-Leland Co.
Catholic Community

House
Shartenberg & Rob-

inson Co.
State Capitol
Individual contribution
Center Church House
State Armory
Business & Profession-

al Woman's Club
United Church Parish

December 6, 1922
December 20, 1922
December 20, 1922
January 29, 1923
March 1, 1923

202.42

5.00 71.77 86.70 85.65

Bridgeport

87.00

House
State Capitol
State Armory
Grieve, Bisset & Hol-

land
State Capitol
F. Brewer & Co.
State Capitol

March 13, 1923

Hartford
Hartford
Waterbury

April 3, 1923
April 6, 1923
April 5, 1923

74.85 210.15 195.50

Hartford
Middletown
Hartford

April 28, 1923
May 18, 1923
June 8, 1923

117.40
86.75
23.85

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The report of the sales for the year ended June 30, 1924, is as follows:

New London New Britain Torrington Winsted

August 17, 1923 $113.10 Sept. 27 & 28, 1923 154.85 November 2, 1923 122.32 November 9, 1923 145.35

Norwich

November 16, 1923

117.55

New Haven

November 22, 1923

156.20

Hartford
Essex
Bridgeport
Hartford
Middletown

203.49 102.50 210.10 114.30

Stamford
Waterbury
New Haven
Bridgeport
Willimantic
Hartford
Hartford

Dec. 4 & 5, 1923
December 7, 1923
Dec. 13 & 14, 1923
December 17, 1923
Feb. 29 & Mar. 1,

1924
March 12, 1924
April 3, 1924
March 29, 1924
April 10, 1924
April 16, 1924
April 17, 1924
May 1, 1924

161.85 151.10 216.65

58.30 112.55 118.35

41.35 146.96

Bridgeport
Portland
Danbury
Meriden
Newington

May 16, 1924 May 23, 1924 June 11, 1924 June 18, 1924 June 20, 1924

101.25

90.75 203.00 97.40 31.10

Hartford

July 1, 1923 to June

Hotel Mohican
Besse-Leland Co.
W. W. Mertz Co.
Second Congregational

Church
Boston Store

(Reid & Hughes Co.) Business & Profes

sional Woman's Club
State Capitol
King's Daughters Hall
St. Charles' Parish
Center Church House
F. Brewer & Co.

St. John's Parish
St. John's Parish
Masonic Rooms
St. John's Parish
H. C. Murray Co.
State Capitol
Sage-Allen Company,

Inc.
Olivet Church
Perry T. Hale's office
John McLean's store
Ives, Upham & Rand
Mrs. Edith Hancock's

home Office sales

30, 1924

355.77

$3326.14

PLACEMENT

We believe that the qualified blind can take their place in selected positions in industry with credit to themselves and to the satisfaction of their employers. This is a new thought to many factory managers, however, who are most ready to assert that the blind person will be injured and that the effectiveness of the department will be hindered and

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