The United States of America: A Pictorial History of the American Nation from the Earliest Discoveries and Settlements to the Present Time, Volume 2

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Imperial Publishing Company, 1905
 

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Page 219 - ... it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity, watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned...
Page 11 - You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil, and blood, and treasure that it will cost us to maintain this declaration, and support and defend these States. Yet, through all the gloom, I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.
Page 219 - Citizens by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations.
Page 187 - Called upon by your country to defend its invaded rights, you accepted the sacred charge before it had formed alliances, and whilst it was without friends or a government to support you. " You have conducted the great military contest with wisdom and fortitude, invariably regarding the rights of the civil power through all disasters and changes.
Page 182 - Can you consent to wade through the vile mire of dependency, and owe the miserable remnant of that life to charity which has hitherto been spent in honor? If you can — go; and carry with you the jest of Tories and the scorn of Whigs — the ridicule, and, what is worse, the pity of the world. Go — starve and be forgotten.
Page 194 - We have probably had too good an opinion of human nature in forming our confederation. Experience has taught us that men will not adopt and carry into execution measures the best calculated for their own good without the intervention of a coercive power.
Page 187 - Mr. President : The great events on which my resignation depended having at length taken place. I have now the honor of offering my sincere congratulations to Congress, arid of presenting myself before them to surrender into their hands the trust •committed to me, and to claim the indulgence of retiring from the service -of my country.
Page 10 - That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved. That it is expedient forthwith to take the most effectual measures for forming foreign Alliances. That a plan of confederation be prepared and transmitted to the respective Colonies for their consideration and approbation.
Page 194 - I do not conceive we can exist long as a nation without having lodged somewhere a power, which will pervade the whole Union in as energetic a manner as the authority of the State governments extends over the several States.
Page 305 - ... geographical line, once conceived, I feared would never more be obliterated from the mind; that it would be recurring on every occasion and renewing irritations, until it would kindle such mutual and mortal hatred, as to render separation preferable to eternal discord. I have been among the most sanguine in believing that our Union would be of long duration. I now doubt it much...

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