The land of the Veda: India briefly described in some of its aspects, including the substance of a course of lectures

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Who amongst us is worthy to comment on such a Masterpiece leave alone recount this author's labours and example in Jaffna benefitting Hindu and Christian alike. Who would the Hindu revivalist Arumuga Navalar be without Rev. Prof.Peter Percival?

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Page 482 - Lie not one to another, seeing that ye have put off the old man with his deeds; and have put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of him that created him...
Page 483 - He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me : and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.
Page 498 - Only let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel of Christ : that whether I come and see you, or else be absent, I may hear of your affairs, that ye stand 'fast in one spirit, with one mind striving together for the faith of the gospel...
Page 403 - Well done, good and faithful servants, " enter ye into the joy of your Lord.
Page 25 - So much of any law or usage now in force within the territories subject to the government of the East India Company as inflicts on any person forfeiture of rights or property, or may be held in any way to impair 500 or affect any right of inheritance, by reason of his or her renouncing, or having been excluded from the communion of any religion, or being deprived of caste...
Page 436 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 482 - Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, and touch not the unclean thing...
Page 42 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all...
Page 482 - There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female, for we are all one in Christ Jesus.
Page 464 - To him that hath shall be given ; and from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.

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