Shakspeare's Schauspiele, erläutert, Volume 5

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Page 82 - Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other.
Page 38 - To show a soul so full of misery As this sad lady's was. Do it by me, Do it again by me, the lost Aspatia ; And you shall find all true but the wild island. Suppose I stand upon the sea-beach now...
Page 38 - Mine arms thus, and mine hair blown with the wind, Wild as that desert ; and let all about me Tell that I am forsaken. Do my face (If thou had'st ever feeling of a sorrow) Thus, thus, Antiphila : strive to make me look Like Sorrow's monument ; and the trees about me, Let them be dry and leafless ; let the rocks Groan with continual surges ; and behind me, Make all a desolation.
Page 144 - Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low, an excellent thing in woman.
Page 38 - Do my face (If ever thou hadst feeling of a sorrow) Thus, thus, Antiphila; strive to make me look Like sorrow's monument; and the trees about me Let them be dry and leafless ; let the rocks Groan with continual surges ; and behind me Make all a desolation.
Page 35 - Collated with all the former editions, and corrected. With notes critical and explanatory. By the late Mr. Theobald, Mr. Seward of Eyam in Derbyshire, and Mr. Sympson of Gainsborough.
Page 45 - Dying, Dying, Eudoxia, dying. Phys. Good sir, patience. Eud. What have you given him ? Phys. Precious things, dear lady, We hope shall comfort him. Val. Oh, flatter'd fool, See what thy god-head's come to ! Oh, Eudoxia!

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