A New Era for Women: Health Without Drugs

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Henry Bill Publishing Company, 1896 - 371 pages
 

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Page 9 - IN this refulgent summer it has been a luxury to draw the breath of life. The grass grows, the buds burst, the meadow is spotted with fire and gold in the tint of flowers.
Page 9 - The air is full of birds, and sweet with the breath of the pine, the balm-of-Gilead, and the new hay. Night brings no gloom to the heart with its welcome shade. Through the transparent darkness the stars pour their almost spiritual rays. Man under them seems a young child, and his huge globe a toy. The cool night bathes the world as with a river, and prepares his eyes again for the crimson dawn.
Page 319 - When we consider how sligfet a cause may interrupt the normal operations of this delicate and highly complex machine called the human organism, how careful and watchful of its health we should be. These natural conditions and beneficient tendencies of the organism may be perverted by various causes such as injury, cold, inflammation, embolism, local or general depression of vitality, etc. For centuries men have climbed mountains, crossed oceans, bridged chasms, delved into the bowels of the earth,...
Page 318 - It is exceedingly difficult to say where asepsis ends and antisepsis begins, for asepsis is usually attained by an antecedent antisepsis. Undoubtedly the greatest of all antiseptics and germicides is health. It is only when the natural and normal efficiency is vitiated that Nature becomes dependent upon Art. The healthy tissues of the human body neither harbor infectious organisms nor favor or aid their subsequent development when introduced. Indeed there cannot now be the slightest doubt but that...
Page 38 - ... themselves are not diseased ? (d) For eighteen years, while in continuous attendance on the acutely sick, I have in every case permitted the brain to feed itself in its own way, and in not a single case, where death was not beyond all question inevitable, did it fail to do itself ample justice and in some cases for four, five, six weeks, and even longer. (e) And in strong support of the conception of this wonderful power of the brain has been the fact that, as disease declined, mental, moral...
Page 38 - ... single case where death was not beyond all question inevitable did it fail to do itself ample justice, and in some cases for four, five, six weeks, and even longer! " (e) And in strong support of the conception of this wonderful power of the brain has been the fact that as disease declined, mental, moral and physical energy increased. What better feeding of the sick can a rational human being ask for than the feeding that Nature prescribes; and that it should be such, it has placed a sentinel...
Page 334 - I want to tell you, with all due emphasis, with all due solemnity, that from the beginning to the end of the nursing months of its life, if you feed your babe more than four times in twenty-four hours, if these times are regulated by cryings and not by regular periods, you will by so much make possible a discharge of your nurse, to be succeeded by the undertaker. And these words might be rightfully chiseled on the headstone, " Died from the ignorance of its mother...

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