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ing the other full in the face, say, with a EXPEDIENCY, therefore, must decide the contemptuous sneer, your Scripture ar. question with individuals, families, and guments are all chaff! We are the judges nations. Now, Sir, all this is plausible : ourselves of what is lawful and unlawful. it is very good. Expediency is a pliable Circumstances alter cases; the circum- argument;—like a nose of wax, it may be stances of a people change, and the law made short or long, sharp or blunt, crook. of marriage must be altered and adapted ed or straight, just as you please." to the existing circumstances. Nay, I will go a little further. If the civil law does We have given this long extract, not regulate the matter, as the habits and because it exhibits at once the lead. feelings of one family, or of one indivi ing opinions and arguments both of dual, differ from those of another, what Domesticus and Clericus. We shall might be proper in one case would be exceedingly improper in another. Or, to

now offer a few short remarks of our be plain, consanguinity has nothing more to do with incest in itself than having the

Much is said in this controversy same length of nose, or wearing the same against inferential reasoning.. But coloured stockings. It is not the consan this is a kind of reasoning, distinctly guinity, but its effectsthe opportunities and temptations which flow from it, that recognised as legitimate, in the Conthe legislator has exclusively in his eye.' fession of Faith

of the Presbyterian And I now venture to observe, that a church (chap. 1. sect. vi.); and it is perfectly satisfactory rule is furnished us, in fact on this reasoning alone that we by which, in the honest exercise of our must rest, and may safely rest, some understandings, and untrammelled by a slavish attachment to the letter of the Le of the most important institutions of vitical law, we may determine how far the our holy religion, particularly infant Code of Incest is to be extended in the baptism and the Christian Sabbath. time and circumstances in which we live. It is, also, only by this kind of reaThe rule is this: The law being intended soning that we are authorized to to guard against the dangers threatening charge guilt upon the female sex-in domestick purity from constant, unrestricted intercourse; wherever such inter

more than one instance of all the incourse may, in consequence of the habits cestuous marriages prohibited in the and manners of a people, be presumed to eighteenth chapter of Leviticus. The exist,-THERE, no matter what be, or be probibitions are immediately, adnot, the degrees of consanguinity and af. dressed to the male sex, and if difinity, the law should take effect;mar, rect prohibition is necessary to conriage be probibited.' Page 20. We quite an undue degree of honour to the stitute guilt, women may be guiltless circumstance of actual relationship and its when the grossest incest is commitgrades, when we judge the law of Incest ted. We are confident that the by it exclusively, in the esteem of en more this subject is examined, the lightened legislators, the INTENCOURSE, more clearly it will appear, that which from the custom and manners of a country may be presumed to exist, is a

what "may be deduced by good and consideration vastly more important, necessary consequence from scripand--the only question to be asked on ture," is as valid as that which is exthe subject more immediately before us, pressly set down in the sacred vois the very plain and intelligible one : lume. All must have recourse to Whether the probabilities of close and inti; this kind of arguing, who deny that mate familiarity between brother-in-law and sister-in-law be such as to demand the inter polygamy is the object of prohibition position of this great moral preservative in Lev. xviii. 18, or else concede

- In certain circumstances, that is, if tbe that it is not forbidden in the whole fact of constant intercourse exists, it Bible. It is by inference only, that would be unlawful for you to marry your sewing girl, or indeed any female friend, they can find polygamy prohibited however distantly related, whether by the by our Saviour and the Apostle Paul. ties of nature or friendship. On the other Within our memory, a work of far hand, if my employment and lot in provi- more learning and plausibility than dence be such, that I scarcely see my sis. Domesticus lias yet given us, was ter-in-law till after my wife's death, I may published by a clergyman in Engwould not be suitable to circumstances, land, the Rev. Mr. Madan, to show but in the other, it would be perfectly so. that polygamy is no where condemn

ed or forbidden in scripture; but rive from it the very principle and that it is the great preservative from whole sanction of the law, it leads impurity, like D.'s law of incest; and him to the most extravagant and ought therefore to be encouraged in shocking absurdities—to deny that all communities. From the circum- there is any natural abhorrence of stance that the apostle forbids it incest—that but for the considera. to clergymen, it was urged that it tion which he states, the nearest of was doubtless lawful to all other all relatives, even by consanguinity, men; exactly as it is now reasoned, might intermarry:--And on the conthat as Moses forbids a man to take trary, to maintain that the law of ina wife to her sister to vex her in her cest extends, or ought to extend, to life time, it necessarily follows that all possible cases, in which frequent he may take the second after the intercourse between the sexes takes death of the first. No small portion of place. On this last principle he is the talent of Britain was employed to obliged to admit, that it would confute this work of the Rev. Mr. Ma- scarcely be possible to specify all dan. See the 63d vol. of the Monthly the cases to which the law ought to Review. We have personally known a extend. A wide door, it is clear, Presbyterian elder, and a shrewd one would be open, for dispute whether, too, who earnestly maintained that in many a particular case, the law polygamy was perfectly agreeable to had been violated or not; whether the law of God, and forbidden only the parties had been previously so by the laws of the state. It is a lit- much in each other's company, as to tle remarkable that our opponents render it lawful, or unlawful, to apply inferential reasoning, not only marry. We lately read of a man to the words of Christ and the apos- who courted a woman assiduously tle, but to Lev. xviii. 18, and yet for more than thirty years, and afterdeny its applicability to the rest of wards married her. Now, by the that chapter. While Moses moreover rule of Domesticus, he ought never gives it as a reason why a man should to have married her; and surely it not marry two sisters at once, that is but reasonable that Domesticus the second would vex the first, should tell us how long, upon his our modern logicians contend that principle, a man may court a woman, it will comfort a woman exceedingly, before it becomes unlawful for him to know that her sister is to take to marry her. Domesticus also exher place after her death; and that tends the influence of the principle this second wife will be the kindest he adopts, beyond all the bounds of mother in the world to the children truth and experience; and even to of the first. We maintain that all the superseding, as his answerers experience, as well as the word of have remarked, of the necessity of God, is against this theory.

the seventh commandment--so far We scarcely know of a commen as it relates to those of the different tator on the law of incest, as con sexes who have habitual intercourse tained in the chapter so frequently with each other. referred to, who does not remark, According to Domesticus, the Conthat one of the salutary effects of session of Faith of the Presbyterian prohibiting marriages among those church, in the article submitted to the who are nearly related by consan- presbyteries, is right entirely by acguinity and affinity, is, that the temp- cident. It so happens, that those who tation to uncleanness is thereby pre are nearly related to each other by vented, among those of the opposite consanguinity or affinity have, in our sexes who usually have the most fre- country, and in many other counquent intercourse with each other. tries, familiar intercourse with each The remark is unquestionably just; other, and therefore they ought not but

when Domesticus seizes on this to intermarry; but if it had happened circumstance, and endeavours to de- otherwise-it' it had happened that

daughters, as soon as born, were se- We do not say fairly, but yet realparated from their fathers, and sis. ly, plausibly, and to bimself saters from their brothers, these rela- tisfactorily. The plain truth is, that tives might intermarry without fault. Domesticus, in this whole argument, Let no reader start at this conse- is on infidel ground. He deserts the quence; for Domesticus himself looks word of God, and goes to reason and it right in the face, without blush- expediency for his law; and here, ing. He is even content that the such men as Hume will stand a good whole doctrine of his essay should chance to beat hiin at his own weastand or fall with it. On this point pons. Veritas justly remarks as follows Clericus justly remarks, on the

"I fear that Domesticus, notwithstand. argument of Domesticus, as founded ing the very vivid picture he gives of do-on expediency, that "notwithstandmestick purity, has unwittingly given coun- ing all his zeal for this great but tenance to a most dangerous licentious- very flexible principle, he seems afness, by declaring bis belief, ' that there terwards conscience struck that it is no natural impropriety in the nearest relations having sexual communion. And bý will not bear him out, in defending saying again, not that consanguinity has the usual practice of the church.” any thing more to do with incest, in itself, After reading in his pamphlet, the than having the same length of nose, or reasoning and ridicule which he emwearing the same coloured stockings.' . ploys to show that the Levitical law is seriously to be regretted that he did of incest has, and can have, no bindnot comply with the judicious advice of his friends in suppressing these senti- ing force on Christian people, bements. In doing so, he would have found cause it stands in a cluster of cerean appropriate place for bis principle of monial enactments, and is itself such expediency. Their publication may do

an enactment, obligatory only on anmore injury to the cause of morality: cient Israel- what was our surprise than his mysterious guardian may be able to counteract. Such opinions, emanating to find in a note, in the last page from such a source, may not only obtain but one of his pamphlet, the followaccess to the minds of the vulgar, many ing statementof wbom may be able, from natural good sense, or experimental piety, to resist

“The reader will please to accept my their deleterious influence, but become whole doctrine in four propositions. Ist. incorporated into the practical morality The Levitical law of incest, the whole law, of many of our educated youth, who will is binding on Christian societies. It carnaturally slide into the system of infide. ries on its front, the stamp of permanent lity, with which these opinions have here. obligation,-being adapted to guard tofore been associated.' It is a pity they against a danger common to us with the had not been left there. They sound too

ancient Hebrews, and which can be much like the licentious philosophy of guarded against only by respecting its the Voltairean school, to be ingrafted provisions. into the system of Christian morals.” “ 2dly. The same reason demands that

something more than the letter of that Domesticus supposes that his fa. law be regarded,—that whatever is deduvourite principle will always, and mechanical balancing, to which I have re

cible from it, by construction (not the safely, lead to the conclusion which peatedly alluded, but fair interpretation he adopts

. But we could not help in conformity with the general principle remarking, that the infidel Hume, of incest) is as really part of the Divine taking reason and philosophy for his will, as if an angel pronounced it to us guide, arrived at exactly the opposite by an audible voice. conclusion, in the case of Henry the gistrate, carefully and with a deep feeling

“3dly. It is the duty of the civil maEighth of England. Yes—and set of responsibility, to make these deducaside the scriptural rule, and subject tions-to give them all the authority of the whole law to the supposed dic. law and support them by the most weighty tates of reason and expediency, and sanctions. every man who wishes to marry his his duty, the church of Jesus Christ must

“ 4thly. If the civil magistrate neglects wife's sister, or his brother's wife, rebuke his unfaithfulness and take care will arrive at the same conclusion not to become partaker in his sin. Wo

ry, and

pears that

ain to any

ed or forbidden in scripture; but rive from it the very p that it is the great preservative from whole sanction of the ered beimpurity, like D.'s law of incest; and him to the most ext

im credit ought therefore to be encouraged in shocking absurditiesall communities. From the circum- there is any natural

y forsaken stance that the apostle forbids it incest—that but for , and gone to clergymen, it was urged that it tion which he states

jope that our was doubtless lawful to all other all relatives, even b shom we che men; exactly as it is now reasoned, might intermarry:- Fion, will not, that as Moses forbids a man to take trary, to maintain t -, receive such a wife to her sister to vex her in her cest extends, or ou life time, it necessarily follows that all possible cases,

ship and com

for their own he may take the second after the intercourse betwe death of the first. No small portion of place. On this

rertainly esteem

byterian church the talent of Britain was employed to obliged to adn confute this work of the Rev. Mr. Ma- scarcely be pos

this description

church dan. See the 63d vol. of the Monthly the cases to wh Review. We have personally known a extend. A wi Presbyterian elder, and a shrewd one would be open

r review to a close, too, who earnestly maintained that in many a po

lers to know, that polygamy was perfectly agreeable to had been vid

sware it may be the law of God, and forbidden only the parties

aps with some saby the laws of the state. It is a lit- much in eac!

- ur opponents, that tle remarkable that our opponents render it

*ation we have given apply inferential reasoning, not only marry. W

'th chapter of Levitito the words of Christ and the apos- who court

pal has been to the tle, but to Lev. xviii. 18, and yet for more t

immentators, controdeny its applicability to the rest of wards me

councils, and not to that chapter. While Moses moreover rule of 1

convincing arguments gives it as a reason why a man should to have

But we have done this not marry two sisters at once, that is but r

liberate conviction, that the second would vex the first, should

way could any thing be our modern logicians contend that princip!

ught to have, and that it will comfort a woman exceedingly, before

.e, nearly as much weight, to know that her sister is to take to mar

whole discerning and conher place after her death; and that tends part of the community. this second wife will be the kindest he ad.

ot believe that the study of mother in the world to the children truth or a twelvemonth, would of the first. We maintain that all the

any man in the United experience, as well as the word of have to offer a new thought or arGod, is against this theory.

the

1, of any worth, on the one side We scarcely know of a commen

other of this controversy tator on the law of incest, as con

can as it arises out of the intained in the chapter so frequently wit etation of the chapter referred referred to, who does not remark, Vay, we do not believe that a that one of the salutary effects of fe thought has been offered on it, prohibiting marriages among those cl nearly two hundred years past. who are nearly related by consan T that can be said has been said, guinity and affinity, is, that the tempi

w repeated a hundred times, for tation to uncleanness is thereby pre

unturies that have gone by.* Now, vented, among those of the opposite sexes who usually have the most fre • Whoever is able and willing to read, quent intercourse with each other. this subject, nearly two folio volumes The remark is unquestionably just;

Latin, plentifully interspersed with but when Domesticus seizes on this genotations of Hebrew (both biblical and circumstance, and endeavours to de

binical), Greek, Syriac, Arabic and persic, ought carefully to consult the fol

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te on the retention or reof that part of the article in

fession of Faith which reo this subject, to consider. vhat they do. What, we ask, hey gain by a rejection or reof the article? Will they pro- uniformity of practice, and thus vent controversy and appeals, ich seems to be the principal obct in view-No such thing. There ill be as much controversy and as nany appeals afterwards, as in times past. Nay, there are portions of the Presbyterian church that cannot, and will not, yield to any human authority, which sanctions the marriages in question. They dare not do it-They would sooner

suffer the severest censures of the or church, leave it, or be expelled from aly it, than submit, even silently, to

what they consider as an abominainly tion in the sight of God, and forbid.and den by his holy law. And for the ject, sake of relieving a few individuals, a dis. who, it is agreed on all hands, have one or acted indiscreetly, and violated the -execu- law of Christian charity, shall the I enact. inoffensive and conscientious be -1 punish grieved? Shall they be driven from

our communion? Shall the Presbyiously en- terian church be the first on earth, l's who, as formally to open a door, as many the Presby- other churches will account it, for rtly be call the most detestable licentiousness

and impurity? Is this church wilmortal SELDEN ling to present herself to the world, uim, juxta disci. Ebraica-De Sy.

as leading the way, to what the most sun. We certainly of Christendom will consider, and much acquaintance we think justly consider, as land deut since we began to filing, and heaven provoking iniqui

e have looked into ty? Forbid it reputation, justice, de, jeartily tired; and be. r should go through, cency, humanity, conscience and hem, would have little piety-Great Head of the church, w this subject.

forbid it!

our

rary and Philosophical Intelligence, etc.

- The difficulty of inspecting of a greater attention being paid to disAuditorius, or Passage of the eases of the car than formerly, an inge.

its peculiar winding structure, nious French Aurist has lately invented a i nown; hence the uncertainty novel instrument, termed an Auriscope, 1: arises in ascertaining the cause which allows a complete inspection of the 55 in this organ. In consequence parts. It consists of a circular brass pl V.Ch. Adv.

2 A

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