Shakespeare's King Lear with The Tempest: The Discovery of Nature and the Recovery of Classical Natural Right

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University Press of America, 2004 - 317 pages
Although he is considered to be the world's greatest dramatist, Shakespeare seems to have escaped the detection of thinkers on politics and the philosophic tradition of thought on man. Shakespeare's 'King Lear' with 'The Tempest' is Mark McDonald's inquiry into the political philosophy of William Shakespeare through a reading of King Lear with reference to The Tempest. McDonald follows an argument connecting King Lear to the question of natural right and to changes in the orders of the western world at the beginnings of modernity.
 

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Contents

On Ancient Ceremonial Monarchy and the Opening Scene of Lear
11
B The Destruction of the Ceremonial Monarchy
16
The Love Test
19
D The Answer of Cordelia and the Great Rage of Lear
25
The Subplot Family of Gloucester
37
A The First Soliloquy of Edmund
39
B The Deception of Gloucester
47
C The Rise of Edmund and the Escape of Edgar
55
G The Slaying of Oswald
169
The Awakening of Lear
171
On the Final Act
175
Ripeness is All
177
a Lear and Cordelia Captured
184
b The Defeat of Edmund and the Apocalyptic Conclusion of Lear
188
CONCLUSION
205
Uses of the Word nature in King Lear from Bartletts Concordance
211

The Fool and the Earl of Kent
63
A On Kent
64
B The Fool and His Practical Teaching
72
C The Failure of Albany
82
D The Teaching of the Fool at the Approach of the Storm
84
On Act III of King Lear
91
B The Fools Prophecy of Merlins Prophecy
98
C On III iii
103
D On III iv
104
The Betrayal of Gloucester
121
Lear Mad at the House of Gloucester
122
The Blinding of Gloucester
131
On Act IV
137
The Argument of Goneril and Albany
142
C On IV iii and the Question of the French Invasion
145
The Doctor
152
a The CounterDeception of Gloucester
154
b The Madness of Lear at Dover
158
Appendix B
215
On the Tripartite Division of the Kingdom
218
Instances of the Word fortune in King Lear from Bartletts Concordance
219
On the Connection of Shakespeares King Lear and The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth
221
On the Origin of the Arthurian Legend and Gildas the Most Ancient British Author
222
Notes to the Preface
225
Notes to the Introduction
226
Notes to Chapter One
231
Notes to Chapter Two
243
Notes to Chapter Three
252
Notes to Chapter Four
259
Notes to Chapter Five
275
Notes to Chapter Six
290
Notes to the Conclusion
298
Bibliography
299
Index
307
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Mark A. McDonald is Adjunct Faculty Member at Oakland Community College.

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