Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

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Cadell and Davies; F.C. and J. Rivington; Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; ... and A. Constable and Company and J. Fairbairn at Edinburgh., 1819 - 498 pages
 

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Page 51 - And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly: yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.
Page 317 - For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God ; I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north : I will ascend above the heights of the clouds ; I will be like the Most High.
Page 318 - But thou art cast out of thy grave like an abominable branch, and as the raiment of those that are slain, thrust through with a sword, that go down to the stones of the pit ; as a carcase trodden under feet. Thou shalt not be joined with them in burial, because thou hast destroyed thy land, and slain thy people : The seed of evil-doers shall never be renowned.
Page 398 - He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue. He meets with a secret refreshment in a description, and often feels a greater satisfaction in the prospect of fields and meadows, than another does in the possession.
Page 254 - Canst thou by searching find out God? canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea.
Page 317 - And it shall come to pass in the day that the LORD shall give thee rest from thy sorrow, and from thy...
Page 44 - Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, and bade the father of his country 'hail! for lo! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, and Rome again is free!
Page 401 - ... clear and brighten the imagination, but are able to disperse grief and melancholy, and to set the animal spirits in pleasing and agreeable motions. For this reason Sir Francis Bacon, in his Essay upon Health,' has not thought it improper to prescribe to his reader a poem or a prospect, where he particularly dissuades him from knotty and subtile disquisitions, and advises him to pursue studies that fill the mind with splendid and illustrious objects, as histories, fables, and contemplations of...
Page 390 - Our sight seems designed to supply all these defects, and may be considered as a more delicate and diffusive kind of touch, that spreads itself over an infinite multitude of bodies, comprehends the largest figures, and brings into our reach some of the most remote parts of the universe.
Page 52 - That saith of Cyrus, He is my shepherd, and shall perform all my pleasure: even saying to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be built; and to the temple, Thy foundation shall be laid.

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