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LETTERE odeporicbe di Angelo Gualan. Nichols's Biographical Anecdotes of
dris,

547 Hogarth,
LITTERS from Burtenshaw' to Lord M. Nogle's Genealogical Hift, of the Royal

Families of Europe,

156
Two, additional, from Ano NORFOLCIENSIS, Phileleutherus, his

drews to Count Welderen,

Discourle on the Faft,

319

between Two Lovers and their NORTHCOTE on the Rights of Man.

Friends,

65 kind,

383

between Capacelli and Zacchi Nouveau, Conces Turcs e Arabes, 467 X
roli,

466 NOUVEAUX Memoirs de l'Acad. Royale
concerning the present State of des Sciences, &c. Berlin, for 1979, 508
Caffel,

ib. Nuix, Abbé, bis Reflections on the

LETTRE sur la literature Allemande, 504 Humanity of the Spaniards in the Westi

LETTSOM's Account of Captain Carver, Indies,

39 Nuove Sperienze Idrauliche, &c. 310

LEWIS XV, Private Life of, concluded,

241

LIBRARY, a Poem,

423

0.

LINNBUS, View of his Writings, 374

LOGAN's Poems,

BSERVATIONS on the Bill for the

LUCINDA,

70

relative to the Sugar Co-

lonies,

237

M.

on the Rights of Man.

kind,

383

(ACAULAY Graham's Hiftory of OEUVRES de M. Etienne Falconet, 311

England, Vols. VI. and VII.

401

OLAVE the Black,

96

MACKAY's Abridgment of the Excise OKEL Y's Translation of the Visions of

Laws,

238 Engelbrecht,

159

MADAN's Thelyphthora, Vol III, 57

Tranflation of « A faithful

MARTIN'S Hobby houghed and pounded,

Narrative of God's gracious Dealingo

473

with Hiel,'

317

MASQUED Weddings,

392

of ' A Display of

MASQUERADES, a Novel,

God's Wonders donc upon the Person

Mathias's Runic Odes,

426

and in the Life of Jaba Engelbrecht,'

MAYER'S Letter on the Going of Are

319

nold's new Pendulum Clock, $7

Discourse on Faith, 397

MEDICINÆ Praxeos Syfilema, Tom. III. OPERE di Antonio Raffaele Mengs, 143

473

ORIGIN and Narrative of the Maratta

MEMOIRE pbyfique et medicinale montrant War,

71

des raports evidens des pbenumenes de la ORPHEUS Priest of Nature, &c.

469

Baguette Divinatoire,

497 ORTHODOXY and Charity uni:ed, 77

MEMOIRS of the Bavarian Academy of

Sciences,

304

of a Society of Arts and Sci.

P.

ences at Batavia,

540

Mengs's Works,

143

ALLISER.

his Life,

523

MIDWIFERY. Sec HAMILTON, Iy phthora,

453

MIRROR. A periodical Paper, 17

PARMENTIERS's Inquiries concerning

MUDGI's Time-keeper, Regifer of, 346

nutritive Vegetables,

460

PARNASSIAN Weeds,

235

Ponnant's Journey to Snowdon, 363

N,

PINOBSCOT, Siege of,

73

Penn'o Remarks on Thelyphthon,

TASH' Colle&ions for the History of

158

Worcesterfire,

257

PERSIAN Epifle to Madan, 232

NECESSITY. See PHILOSOPNICAL. PEYRILHL, Dr. bis History of Surgery,

NIPTUNI of Eorope,

156

461

NERVOUS Syfem, Differtation on, iss PHILOSOPHICAL Necefficy briefly inva-

Nou Hiftorisebe abbandlungen, &c. 304

lidated,

67

NEWMAN on Solvents,

76

Estay on the Weight of

NIW Turkish Tales,

461 she Air, &c.

307

Pir.

74

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hewton's Candiphonia 20%

156

426

PHYSIKALISCR - Metallurgischen Abe ROYAL Families of Europe,
bandingen, &c.

467 Rozzar's Di&t. of Agriculture, 539
PIONOTTi's Meceorological Conje&uies, Runic Odes,

305
PINDARIC Ode,

235

1 Plan for the confideration of Parlia.

S.

ment,

70

Pozms for the Vale at Bath Estran: SACCH

AGGIO di Eglogbe Militari, &c. 306
POETICAL Amusements at a Villa near SAGGIO Orittografico, &c. 310
Bach, Vol. IV.
384 SAUCI-Pan,

235
Epiftle to Dr. Robertson, 334 Saussure, M. de, his Travels in the
Poisons. See Essay.

Alps,

378

See WILMER,

SEASIDE, a Poem,

470

POLYGAMY. See HILL.

SENTIMENTAL Excurfions to Wind-
PRECIS Historique e Experimental des for,

389
Pbenomenes Electriques, &c. 381 SERMON in French on Decency in exter-
PRIESTLEY's Exper, in Natural Philo- nal Appearance, &c.

240

sophy, Vol. II.

337

SERMONS by Demifly,

78

Serm. at Birmingham, 475

Collection of, from the most
PRINCE'S Sermon before the Antigalli- eminent Divines,

ib,
cans,

478
by Hurd,

117

Private Life of Lewis XV, translated, --, Single, 320, 396, 477

182 SERVANTS. See APPEALS.

PROTESTANT AQociation, 386 SESTINI's Letters,

307

Preacher,

78 SHAW's Inquiry into the Authenticity of

PRUSSIA, King of, his Art of War, a Offian's Poems,

412

Poem,

285 SHERIDAN's Critic,

287

PULTNLY'S View of the Writings of

Trip to Scarborough, a Co-
Linneys,
374 medy,

373
SIENNA. See TRANSACTIONS.

SIGAUD de la Fond, M. his view of

R.

Electrical Phenomena,

381

SIGNs of the Times,

475
ASPE's Essay on Oil Painting, 90 SMALL-Pox. See BLACK.

Tabby in Elyfium, 236 SMITH's Philosoph. Inquiries, Part III.
READER's Sermon on Popery, 396

238
RECHERCHES Cbymique fur l'Etain, 458 SOLDANI, Abbé, his Oryctographical
fur les Vegetaux nouriflans, Efsay,

310

&c.

460 SOLVENTS. See NEWMAN.

REFLECTIONS Pbilosopbe sur l'Origine de Songs of the Genile Shepherd, 470
la Civilisation, &c.

382 SPEECHES in the House of Lords on the
REFORMATION, the, Treatise concern- Sunday Bill,

237

ing,

465 St. John's Every Maa his own Farrier,

RIGISTER of the Going of Mudge's

473

Time-keeper,

346 STORIA della Letteratura Italiana, 308

Relre's Estay on the Seduction of Wo. Antica del Mefico,

462

men,

237 SWINDEN, M. Var. his Letter concern.

RIMARKS On Johnstope's Account of his ing a remarkable Genius in Mechanics,
Engagement with the French, 156

igo

REPORTS of the Humane Society for SULZIR's Journal of Travels through the

1779 and 1780,

239

Southern Countries of Europe, 543

Review of the Condod of John Earl of SUPERSTITION. See BURTON.

Bucks,

384 SYMPATHY, a Poem,

REVOLUTION, a Novel,

390

-, a Treatise on. See Jack.

RALINISCHE Beitrage zur Gelcbrsamkeit,

&c.

305 SYNOPUIS of Birds,

394

RIFLESSIONE, imparziali sopra l'uina-

gita degli Spagnoli, &c.

308

T.

RIMIS

13

ROBERTSON, Dr. Poet, Epifle to, 234 NABBY in Elygum,

236

ROBINSON, Mr. on Toleration, 474 TABLEAU de Paris,

227

ROTHERAM's Effay on the Ditinction TEMPLE of Fashion,

235
between the Soul and Body of Man, 6% THELYPHTHORA, Vol. III,

6

THI.

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320

SON.

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57, 167

TE

,
FSnowdoni tee pennait
1 Penkerbor's himes, 13.

Prott's Sympathy, a poem, 220.

211

20

THELYPHTHORA, Publications relat, to, WATSON's Chemical Essays,

158, 232, 293, 296, 453, 473, 474 WEBSTER--Medicinæ Praxeos Syflema, THEMMEN, Dr. his Inaugural Differta- Tom. III.

473 tion,

560 WESKET's Digest of Insurances, &c. 205 THOUGHTS on Hunting,

West's Miscellaneous Poems, 155 THOUVENEL's Philosophical Refem. WHISPERs for the Ear of the Author of blance of the Phenomena of the Virgula Thelyphthora,

474 Divina, and those of Magnetism and WILMER's Observations on Poisonous Ele&ricity, 497 Vegetables,

157 TICKELL'S Alteration of Ramsay's Wilson's Observations relative to the Gentle Shepherd,

470

Influence of Climate on Vegetable and TIRABOSCHI's Hist. of Italian Litera- Animal Bodies, ture,

308 WORCESTERSHIRE, History of, 257 TRANSACTIONS of the Acad. of Sci. Word to Madan,

158 ences ar Sienna, Vol VI.

464 TRIP to Scarborough,

379 TRIUMPH of Dulness, a Poem, 313

U.
TRIUMPHS 0 Temper. See HAYLEY.
TUCKER on Government,

271

die Reformation, 465 concluded, 321 VILLENCOUR's Discourse on Lan. TWENTYMAN's Faft Sermon, 478 guages,

462 Two Actions between Howe and Dive, VILLoison's Grecian Anecdotes, 530

395
VINDICIÆ Flavianæ,

429 VOYAGE dans les Mers de l'Inde, 455 w.

Voyages dans les Alpes,
AKEFIELD's Translation of the
Firft Epittle to the Theffalo.

419 Walker's Elements of Elocution, 81 IMENES, Abbé, his Hydraulic Exo concluded, periments,

310 WATER. See HENRY.

UBI

378

W

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195

Turkish Tolen, how 461

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Art. I. Liberal Educatior : or, a Practical Treatise on the Methods

of acquiring useful and polite Learning. By the Rev. Vicesimus
Knox, A. M. Late Fellow of St. John's College, Oxford, and
now Master of Tunbridge-School. 8vo. 3 s. 6 d. Boards. Dilly,
1781.
NE of the first ideas which will occur to a reada

er of this Treatise will be, as Mr. Knox rightly obferves, the multitude of books which has appeared on the subject of education. Numerous, however, as have been the authors who have written on this enteresting topic, it is still far from being exhausted; as, indeed, is evident from the present performance, in which much is to be met with that is well worthy of remark and observation.

If Mr. K. amuse us not by fingularity of opinion, he, at leaft, gratifies us by his good sense, and the juftness of his fentiments. Novelty, indeed, is not be expected from a Writer on Education who means not to recommend speculation, but practice; not to innovate, but to restore: his design, in short,

is to speak in favour of that ancient system of education which consists in a clasical discipline, and which has produced in our nation many ornaments of human nature.' By classical discia pline is meant, we presume, the discipline which prevails in pube lic schools. In discusling the question, whether we should prefer public or private education, he is a warm advocate for the former.

• From the time of Quintilian to the present day, it has remained a doubt, whether public or private education is the more conducive to valuable improvement. Quintilian approved of public education, and has supported his opinion, as indeed he always does, with reasons which carry with them irrefiftible convic ion. From the arguments VOL. LXV.

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which he has used, and from the di&tates of observation, I am fed noe
only to prefer public, but entirely to disapprove private education,
unless under the particular circumstances which I shall presently enu-
merate.

• Though, upon the whole, I prefer the education of schools, yet I
know that much licentiousness has often been found in them. The
prevailing manners of the age, and of the world at large, are apt to
infinuate themselves into thofe seminaries of learning, which, by their
feclufion from the world, migbt be fuppofed to be exempted from its
corruptions. The scholars bring the infection from home; and per-
haps the masters themselves at length acquire a tinge from the predo-
minant colour of the times. From whatever cause it proceeds, it is
certain that schools often degenerate with the community, and con•
tribute greatly to increase, by diffufing, at the most fufceptible pe-
riods of life, the general depravity. The old scholastic discipline re-
[axes, habits of idleness and intemperance are contracted, aod the
fcholar often comes from them with the acquifition of effrontery alone
to compensate for his ignorance. When I recommend public schools,
therefore, I must be understood to mean places of education where the
intention of the founder is not quite forgotten, and where a degree of
the more practical part of the original discipline is still retained. Such,
I truft, may be found; and such will increase in number, when the
general diffipation, which, it is confeffed, has remarkably prevailed
of late, fhall be corrected, by public diftress, or by some other dispen-
fation of Providence.

• The danger which the morals are said to incur in schools, is a weighty objection. I moft cordially agree with Quintilian, and with other writers on this subject, that it is an ill exchange to give up innocence for learning. But, perhaps, it is not true, that in a well-disciplined school (and it is only such an one which I recommend), there is more danger of a corruption of morals than at home. I am not onacquainted with the early propenfity of the human heart to vice, and I am well aware that boys contribute greatly to each others corruption. But I know, that the pupil who is kept at home cannot be at all hours under the immediate eye of his parent or his instructor; it muft happen, by chance, necellity, or neglect, that he will often af. fociate with menial servants, from whose example, especially in great and opulent families, he will not only learn meanness, but vice. But fuppofing him to be restrained from fuch communication, the examples he will see in the world, and the temptations he will meet with in an intercourse with various company at an early age, will affect his heart, and cause it to beat with impatience for his emancipation from that restraint which must be taken off at the approach of manbood. Then will his paffions break forth with additional violence, as the waters of a ftream which have been long confined. In the courfe of my own experience, I have known young men nearly rained at the university, who attributed their wrong conduct to the immoderate reAtraint of a domestic education. The sweets of liberty never before tasted, and the allurements of vice never before withstood, become too powerful for rcäftance at an age when the passions are all frong, rcason immature, and experience entirely deficient.

. After

1

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