The Unity of Italy: The American Celebration of the Unity of Italy, at the Academy of Music, New York, Jan. 12, 1871, with the Addresses, Letters, and Comments of the Press

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Putnam, 1871 - 197 pages
 

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Page 153 - Then was the iron, the clay, the brass, the silver, and the gold, broken to pieces together, and became like the chaff of the summer threshingfloors; and the wind carried them away, that no place was found for them: and the stone that smote the image became a great mountain, and filled the whole earth.
Page 24 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 24 - The right of every man to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience...
Page 106 - Independence that governments "derive their just powers from the consent of the governed...
Page 147 - peace hath her victories no less renowned than war,' and that the noble attitude of Pius IX, throwing the vast influence of the pontificate into the scale of well-attempered freedom, standing as the advocate of peaceful progress, the promoter at once of social amelioration, industrial development, and political reform, unmoved by the parade of hostile armies hovering...
Page 169 - I have had the honor to receive your favor of the 15th instant, and thank you for the ordinance which was enclosed in it. My sentiments, with respect to the navigation of the Mississippi, have been long fixed, and are not dissimilar to those, which are expressed in your letter. I have ever been of opinion, that the true policy of the Atlantic States...
Page 55 - He shall judge the poor of the people, he shall save the children of the needy, and shall break in pieces the oppressor.
Page 26 - ... liberty, virtue, and glory; she is chained and covered with blood, but she still knows her strength and her future destiny; she is insulted by those for whom she has opened the way to every improvement; but she feels that she is formed to take the lead again; and Europe will know no repose till the nation which in the dark ages lighted the torch of civilization with that of liberty shall be enabled to enjoy the light which she created.
Page 111 - ... Batavia with Medary as editor until early in 1836. The motto of the Sun is typical of Medary's political philosophy: "Unawed by the influence of the rich, the great, or the noble, the people must be heard, and their rights protected." * Never in Medary's long career was he to waver from his belief that governments are made for the people and not the people for governments. Although little is known of the Ohio Sun, one learns from an editorial in the Western Aegis and Public Advertiser of June...
Page 170 - ... Conference hereby goes on record as commending the New Hampshire Legislature of enacting this resolution, and urges that. Congress give prompt and favorable consideration to the recommendations contained therein ; and be it further Resolved, That copies of this resolution be sent to Gov. Hugh Gregg, the president of the State senate, the speaker of the house of representatives, all members of the New Hampshire congressional delegation, and to the press. UNITED STATES SENATE, COMMITTEE ON ARMED...

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