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325

Beneatų a beach the war-affecting race
Of Amazons, to thee a statue rais’d,
Where Ephesus' proud towers o’erlook the main:
Otrera first perform’d the holy rites,
While round in saliar dance they clang’d their arms,
Hoarse to the hymn resounding : till the choir
At length they form’d and measur’d o'er the ground
Respondent to the shrill fife's feeble strains.
Not yet Minerva, to the stags a foe,

330

Drew

Ver. 323. Beneath, &c.] The poet in the Msata Auce Sandwv, one of the Amazonians, as the following lines gives us an history of the first scholiast informs us. rise and progress of Diana's celebrated temple Ver. 331. Not yet, &c.] From this passage at Ephesus, which he assures us, the Amazons in the author, we may gather two things : were the first occasion of, by the little statue that the Tibic of the antients were of the they raised under a beach, or (as Dionyfius has (Osıx) bones of deer, and that their inventress it) in the niche of an elm, a striking instance of was Mincrva : the simplicity of the first ages. The grandeur of that temple in after-times, and the particular

Prima terebrato per rara foramina buxo, veneration wherein Diana was held there, is too

Ut daret effeci Tibia longa fonos : well known to require any thing from me on

Vox placuit : liquidam faciem referentibus undis, that head. " Great is Diana of the Ephesians,"

Vidi, virgineas intumuisse genas :

Ars mihi non tanti eft, valeas mea tibia, dixi, was the cry of her blind adorers; and that Diana, was a small statue, as we are told, of

Excipit abjeétam cespite ripa suo. ebony, made by one Canitia, which the Ephe- says Minerva in Ovid's faftorum lib. 6. ver. fians called 4.0Tetes, or one that fell down from 697. And in Aristophanes, a Bæotian says, Jupiter. There were two temples, the first not so grand as the second : Eroftratus, to make

Υμεις δοσοι Θηβαθεν αυλητα παρα, ,

Τοις οσινους φυσητε τον πρωκτον κυνος. . himself famous, burnt the first, which Alexander

be. offered to rebuild at his own expence, if the where the scholiast observes he uses 0511015, Ephesians would put his name on the front: cause formerly pipes were made ato twn tha@EW but they rejected it, by telling him, “ it was ostav, from the bones of stags. They were not fit one God should build to another.” The sometimes made of alles bones : one would wonsecond, and the more sumptuous Edifice, is fup- der, says Plutarch, that an afs, e taXUTATOS, *«* pofed to have been burnt in the time of αμεσύτατος ων ταλλα, an animal fo heavy and Constantine. There are some ruins, and a few averse to music should afforj 05809 der Totator xat broken pillars of this structure still remaining - peTimTatov, the most shrill toned and musical an account of which may be seen in Spon's bones. Whoever thinks it worth his while to voyage. See Montfaucon's antiquities, b. 2. read more about the pipes, &c. of the antients, p. J. C. 11. plate 6. fig. 24, 25. Otrera or may find an account of them in Montfaucon, Hippo, it seems, was the first priestess, and part the ad of the 3d vol. b. 5. c. 2.

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frienza soul

Τ Η Ε

Fourth HYMN of CALLIMACHU S.

TO DELOS.

F sacred Delos, great Apollo's nurse,
When, when, my soul, or ever wilt thou sing?
Moft facred, all the Cyclades might well

Each furnish theme divine : But Delos furft From every Muse demands the tribute lay,

5 For that she first their infant God receiv’d,

And

Hymn to Delos.) Hymns upon these popular amongst which doubtless was this of Callimaoccasions were a kind of prize poems; which chus. Pindar, we are told, was requested by most of the poets wrote, if not through a prin- the people of the island Cos to write a hymn ciple of religion, at least through a delire of ac- upon Delos, and he plainly tells us he will do quiring that character: the sure consequence of fo, in his first Pythian, and begs parden of that which was the particular esteem of the people. ile and Apollo, for delaying their prailıs till he At the time of the Theoria or Delian festival bas sung those of his own country; fome celebrated poet always compofed the hymn,

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Or view their country more ! Diana's arms,
Blest Ephesus, thy fortress, thy defence !

God'dess of ports, divine Munychia hail !
Let none contemn DIANA; Oeneus felt
Her heavy hand avenging: Let none dare
To rival in her arts the huntress queen:
For with no trivial mulet the proud presumption
Of Atreus' son she fin'd-Nor to their bed
Let any court the virgin : Wretched joys
Crown’d Otus and Orion's bold address:
Let none decline the solemn choir to join,
Not even Otrera's favour'd-self refus'd
Unpunish’d, unafflicted : Goddess hail,
Great queen, and be propitious to the song ! !

360

Ver: 352. Goddess, &c.] See the remarks on his daughter. Mabw, in the original is used for verse 46 above. She was called Munychia from pæna, or rather, as I have rendered it, a mulet : Munych a at Athens, which the scholiast tells us Donatus observes, Pretium pro ftultitia eft pæna, 150 leipos T8 wergaws. The story of Oeneus is well pretium pro virtute lucrum. Andria Act 3. 8. s. known, that he neglected Diana in the fa. Ver. 359: Orion Or Oarion, as he is fie. cred rites, which he paid to all the deities, for quently called amongst the poets, is said to have which she incited his neighbours to raise a war attempted to ravish Diana. against him, and besides

On Oeneus fields she sent a monstrous boar, Tentator Orion Diana,

That levell’d harvests and whole forests tore, Virgineà domitus sagittà, according to Homer. Agamemnon's offence, Dice says Horace. See an ingenious bistory of Orion in tys Cretensis tells us, was the shooting a goat in Banier's Mythology, vol. 4. b.7 c.7. Otus was the grove of Diana, a place held very sacred. one of the famous Aloides, who were slain accordThe price of which offence was no less than ing to some, by Diana in Naxos, for Orion's crime.

-Et integre

End of the Hymn to DIANA.

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F sacred Delos, great Apollo's nurse,
When, when, my soul, or ever wilt thou fing?
Most sacred, all the Cyclades might well

Each furnish theme divine : But Delos firft
From every Muse demands the tribute lay,

5 For that she first their infant God receiv’d,

And

Hymn to Delos.) Hymns upon these popular amongst which doubtless was this of Callimaoccasions were a kind of prize poems ; which chus. Pindar, we are told, was requested by most of the poets wrote, if not through a prin- the people of the island Cos to write a hymn ciple of religion, at leaft through a desire of ac upon Delos, and he plainly tells us he will do quiring that character: the fure consequence of so, in his first Pythian, and begs parden of that which was the particular esteem of the people. ille and Apollo, for delaying their prailis till he At the time of the Theoria or Delian festival bas sung those of his own country ; some celebrated poet always compofed the hymn,

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And first triumphant hail'd the Deity.
Not with less hate the nine pursue the bard
Forgetful of Pimplea, than Apollo
Him who forgets his Delos:-Be my strains
Turn’d then to Delos : That th' approving God
At once may favour and inspire the song.

Tho'to tempestuous feas and storms expos’d,
Its firm foundations rooted in the deep,
Unshaken stands the isle ; round whose rough shores

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(More

Μη μου κραναα νεμεσασαι

not : Spanheim's first conjecture, that they proδαλος, ενα κεχυμαι

bably were once in betier case, seems quite Ειξαν ω' πολλωνιας Αμφοτεραντοι χαριτων groundless : and his second, though more reasonΣυν Θεους ζευξω τελος. .

able is yet, I think, not satisfactory : he says, Philo makes it clear, that Pindar performed his they were called segWtata, on account of the design, when he says, Ava xas Iiirdapos to the great veneration they paid to Delos : it is true, Δηλου φησι, χαιρ' ω θεοτιμητε, &c. Nothing can they are known fo to have done ; but were not begin more nobly than the present hymn, the other places equally religious in the worship double interrogation of Tiva xpcov, and Womt,

wort, they payed to that island ?-a town has been rouses the attention and the address to his foul, celebrated and esteemed venerable for having sovue, is elegantly poetical. Pihorntop, is Pindar's had a great man in it, a country for a particular frequent address, and Oups, he likewise uses. city or temple, and why not a number of islands There is no appearance of a tautology in these for having one of themselves so eminently retwo interrogations, as has been imagined, the nowned? The reader must judge. one means at what particular time, when ? the Ver. 13. Tho', &c.] This is a very difficult other, will you ever—?

passage in the original : I have endeavoured to Ver. 3. Mot sacred, &c.] As these islands give it as poetical a sense, as I am able: I had had their name from surrounding Delos (Cycla- once rendered it more paraphrastically, thus : das fic appellatas, quod omnes ambiunt Delum.) It seems probable they had thence also their title

About its desert coasts thorough winds blow of reputalco, or most sacred) as Delos was a part

Howling, as round some billow-beaten rock, of these Cyclades, and looked upon itself the

To smiling Ceres and the generous steed most facred place in the world. Otherwise why

Ungrateful tho’ its foil, fit place of rest a parcel of poor wretched islands famed for no

For cormorants that wing the mid-way air : thing but the misery and horror wherewith they

Tho'thus unmov'd it braves th’ Icarian waves threatned the offending Romans.

Tha: proudly o'er its cliffs their curling foam

Triumphant dath : tho' once its barren shores (Spretæ Myconos, humilisque Seriphos.)

None but the wandring race of fishers knew : why they should be so highly honoured, I know Yet when to Ocean's and his Tethys' court, &c.

The

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