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THE onested intercourse with the Continent and with America, renders it. - o o acquaint the friends of English literature, to whom the \o MAgazine is again accessible, that his work is regularly delivered by Too Post-Mosons, on all parts of Europe, at Toro goods per annum, or of ove for six monihs, the Supplémentary Number inclusive and perso residing in England, destrous of having this Miscellany regularly delivered to to fiend in any part of the world, may have the Numbers sent as publishoil, on the same ions, by giving their orders. and making paymentTo Mr. Woo Sangor, of the General Post office, London. for the Co. bordering on the Baltic and Mediterranean, and for Portugal and the Brazils. To Mo Cowie, G. P. O. for Hamburgh, Germany, and Holland. 10 Mo. Thoro, G. P. O. for the United States, West Indies, Baham

ora, Bermuda, Canada, and Nova Scotia.

To Mr. Austro, G. P. O. for Ireland.

To Mr. Guy, of the India House, for the Cape and India. - Nothing therefore is requisite both those different places to give orders to the - onasters or in England to make payment to the persons above named, or for them to any local Post-master ; to score the punctual delivery of this Mago

o on any part of the civilized world.

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- LoNinox PRINTEp. - oston Re-printed by Moog & FRANCIS,

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Eustace's Tour. A TOUR THROUGH TALY, exhibiting a view of its SCENERyo ANTIQUITIES, and its MONUMENTS; particularly as they are QB JECTS of CLASSICAL INTEREST and ELUCIDATION: with a account of the present state of its Cities and Towns; and occasional observation on the recent społiations of the French. By the Rev. JOHN CHETWODI EUSPACE. In 2 vols. 8vo, with plates. “This is one of the best books of travels that has appeared since we began our abours.” - - - Edinburgh Review, No. 1/7, p. 378 * Mr. Eustace is endowed with all the natural and acquired gifts and advantages, which fitted him for intimately knowing Italy and Italians.” Monthly Review, op. 114.

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-- From the London Monthly Review for June 1816, This is altogether a strange pocation. It is generally understood to proceed from the pe of a lady of rank and eccentrio, the daughter of an Irish Earl, and wife of the heir to an Eng. o o and to contain a delineation of her own life, as well as of the lives of the personage introduced.” -

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TO THE FORTY-Fi

MONTHLY

RST VOLUME OF THE

MAGAZINE.

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THE
SUBSTANCE

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WRITTEN BY

An Englishman resident at Paris

DURING
THE LAST REIGN
of the

EMPEROR NAPOLEON.

WITH AN APPENDIX

of
OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS.

“How nations sink, by darling schemes

- opprest,

vengeance listens to the fool’s

request.”—-Wanity of Human Wishes.
2 vols. 8vo.

fThis historical work is the production of Mr.
Hobbious E, the son of Sir BENJAMIN Hob-
House; and where is the Briton who would
not be proud of such a son, or the country
which ought not to glory in possessing such
a citizen?---At a period when the press is
raced o the multiplied misrepresenta-
`tions of the hirelings of courts; and when
the spawn of corruption insult us by their
Poems, Travels, Tours, Pilgrimages, Histo-
ries, Pamphlets, Journals, Reviews, News-
pers, Paintings, Engravings, Dramatic
xhibitions, Festivals, and Monuments, Mr.
Hobhouse has voluntarily stepped forward,
like another Leonidas, to oppose the force of
truth to the overwhelming torrent, and to
rescue the cause of Liberty, and the match-
less exertions of its defenders, from the obio-
quy with which a trained band ofol.
are endeavouring to cover them. This work
merifs, therefore, a conspicuous place in
the library of o man who justly values
the character of freeman; and, whatever
may be the insolent assumptions of the venal
writers who bask in the sunshine of power, it
ought to be handed down to P. not
only as a correct account of the events it
records, but as a faithful representation of
the honourable feelings of nine out of ten of
our intelligent contemporaries. For our own
parts, we continue the undismayed friends
of those principles of Public Liberty which
were established in England in 1688, and in
America in 1776; which were nobly assert-
ed in France in 1789, but which have been
malignantly opposed by confederacies of
kings since 1790, and are now endangered
by the forcible restoration of the Bourbons
in France, Spain, and Naples: we therefore

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participate in most of the sentiments of Mr. IHobhouse, and earnestly recommend the general circulation of his work as a phenomenon of political virtue, and as an antidote to the falsehoods and perversions which are so profusely scattered by political profligacy.]

Miss williams's MISREPREs ENTATIONs. Book this preface is concluded, notice should be taken of a work, entitled, “A Narrative of Events, which have taken place in France, from the landing of Napoleon Buonaparte, on the 1st of March, 1815, till the restoration of Louis XVIII.”—which work, though it made its appearance after this collection of letters had been prepared for the press, seemed to the writer to add to the urgency which he imagined to exist, for attempting to disabuse his fellowcountrymen on the subject of the return and last reign of the Emperor Napoleon. Certainly the author of that work and the writer of these letters did not look at the same side of the shield, and it is possible that one city, in the diversities of civil discord, may, like Pope's single nymph, present many moral portraits: “All how unlike each other, all how true.”

But it must be permitted him to declare solemnly, that, were it not notorious that the composer of the Narrative was a spectator of the events she describes, he would not hesitate to aver, that she had employed the optics of the editors of some ministerial journal, rather than those eyes which beamed with delight at the dawn of continental freedom, and communicated their animation to so many admirers of revolutionary France.

It may be necessary to add, that, although that narrative will appear to be directly contradicted by many positions contained in these letters, yet not a line of them was written in the contemplation of such a controversy, nor, except in one solitary instance, where the assumed fact was too important to be left uncon

Mox. MAG. No. 286.

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