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- COM-PRISING - Noosing INTELLIGENCE FROM THE WARIOUS DISTRICTS OF THE - - top kingbow . THE BRITISH CONNECTIONS IN orca. AFRICA, THE EAST INDIES, THE WEST Notes, WESTERN ASIA. - - AND FROM ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD

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prompt and liberal patronage which we have received in the republicaspox Monroy MAGAZINE, has convinced us, that there is no want - itizens of the United States to encourage works of this their prollections. The present endeavour to issue a n, we trust will be sufficient proof of our zeala variety of tastes by a variety of entertainment. - red by many, who have regretted the political com: on of the Londos Monthly MAGAZINE, that they would cheerfully give or names, it we would issuesome English periodical work, which should be oom any countenance either to those principles of Anarchy or Despotism, in blood. - We have read and examined ; we have consulted lite

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ai cal friends; and have decided in favour of the LITERARY PAN. R. containing the richest fund of useful information and amusement of any tion at present circulated from the London presses. It will be sound to . judicious selection of concise, micellaneous matter, on every subject properly admitted into a work of this description, arranged in perspicuo so that the scholar, the friend of science, or the reader whose sole object a leisure hour with entertaining sketches, may readily turn to his department.

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It is unnecessary for us to expatiate on the merits of a work of establis acter, and by no means unknown in this country. We often it to the pub full hope of a degree of patronage proportioned to our efforts to plea copy will faithfully adhere to the original, as to the contents; in style of we flatter ourselves that we shall be able to equal the London edition, made arrangements to receive each number, by the earlies opportunity spare neither Poins nor expense to republish them with the onos:

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- Agents for the Monthly Magazine are respects.
licited to become agents for the Panaroma, and o

terms.

- Cow protroys. - to The Price of this Work is 50 cents a No. 6 numbers making a volume, or half year consi

the quantity of matter, it may be pronounced the
est periodical work in America.

Agents in the country, who engage Six or more g will be allowed 25 per cent, commission.

* * Booksellers, Stationers, Druggists, Makers and
dors of Patent Medicines, Bealers in o
fact, all who wish to have a permanency given to
advertisements, to have them attentively of
y circulated, will find it their interest to -
the covers of this Magazine.

either attach their composes

have them in the ordinary way.

advertising is considered of grea. o

land, may be inferred fro
which appear in so man

London,

Magazine.

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When the Monthly Magazine was first planned, two leading ideas occupied the minds of those who undertook to conduct it. The first

was, that of laying before the Public various objects of information and discussion, both amusins ind insuructive :

the second v as tha.

af lending aid to the propagation of those liberal principles respecting some of the most in portant concerns of mankind, which l, we been either deserted or virulently opposed by other Periodical Miscelanics; but upon the mainly and , ational support of which the

r Fame and Fate of the age must ultimately depend.——Pk rack to Month ix Mag, Vol. I. n As long as those who write are ambitious of making Converts, and " giving their Opinions a Maximum of Influence and celebri.v, the s most extensively circulated Miscellany will repay, with the greatest Eiffect, the Curiosity of those who read, whethe, it be ior Amise. • ment or for Instruction.—JOHNSON. - * : ... " * NT on * ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS. ,

To the Editor of the Monthly Magazine. S1R, . WAS glad to observe that the interesting subject of the proper management of our insane fellow-creatures, is discussed through the medium of a work so widely circulated as the Monthly * - - Magazine. * It is melancholy to think in how great - a degree the sufferers under this disease have been the prey of mercenary speculators, or the victims of neglect and brutality. During the last century, in which science made so many advances, and Christianity exhibited herself as the parent of so much active benevolence, the state of the insane appears to have been, k in great measure, overlooked, and to have derived little mitigation from the increase - of knowledge, or the more general diffusion of benevolent seelings. Of this inattention, the recent, and, it is to be feared, the present, state of pauper lunatics affords too ample proof, and can only be accounted for by the dread which this disorder inspires, and the ignorance which has so generally prevailed in regard to its true character. Happily, however, ignorance and indifference on this subject have ceased ; the current of public commisseration hos, at length, fairly set in the direction of this calamity; and has exhibited itself, among | other ways, by the reformation of several old asylums—a parliamentory inquiry into the state of these establishigents, —and the erection, under the authority of parliament, of several extensive boos:

pauper lunatics. The Ölject of the new establishments has,al hełey - io all - $

& Q

es for the proper aggommodation of

cases, been two-sold :—First, To provide the means of cure and relief for those whose cases admit of it; and secondly, suitable accommodation for confirmed cases of lunacy. Whether these two oljects can be properly pursued in the same establishment, is a question of some importance to those who are about to opply the wants of their respective districts. Three letters have lately appeared is: the Monthly Magazine, under the signa. ture of Thomas Bakeweil, upon this sub. ject, in which it is asserted, that the sepa. ration of curable and incurable lunatics is almost essential to recovery. In support of his views, the writer makes a compari. son of the proportion of cures in several public establishments with those occurring in his own private asylum at Spring Vale. Among others, he mentions the Retreat, in which there is always a large proportion of the incurable class, as affording, by the comparatively small number of its recoveries in recent cases, a striking confirmation of his sentiments. He says, if a different system had obtained there, instead of fifty-six cures in sixtee: years, there might have been five hus:dred and sixty. This, to be sure, is rāther a serious charge, and 10:ght well have claimed the attention of the managers of the Retreat, if it had not happened that this institution is confined solely to deranged persons of the Society of Friends; and that drring the sixteen

years of which he speaks there were bit • .

one, buildred and forty-nine cases under Coire. - - - The questign, however, is not whether

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