The Quarterly Review, Volume 190

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Page 369 - For, while she makes her silk-worms beds With all the tender things I swear ; Whilst all the house my passion reads, In papers round her baby's hair ; She may receive and own my flame, For, though the strictest prudes should know it, She'll pass for a most virtuous dame, And I for an unhappy poet.
Page 255 - I think myself more fortunate than all my fellow-citizens in having the distinguished honour to be the first to stand in Your Majesty's royal presence in a diplomatic character ; and I shall esteem myself the happiest of men if I can be instrumental in recommending my country more and more to Your Majesty's royal benevolence...
Page 231 - ... mastery of the seas; and then the united force of all Europe will not be able to subdue us. The only way to keep us from setting up for ourselves is to disunite us.
Page 255 - I was the last to conform to the separation ; but the separation having been made, and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the friendship of the United States, as an independent power. The moment I see such sentiments and language as yours prevail, and a disposition to give this country the preference, that moment I shall say, let the circumstances of language, religion, and blood, have their natural and full effect.
Page 320 - Another character, now worn out and gone, was the country squire; I mean the little independent gentleman of three hundred pounds per annum, who commonly appeared in a plain drab or plush coat, large silver buttons, a jockey cap, and rarely without boots.
Page 512 - I began printing books with the hope of producing some which would have a definite claim to beauty, while at the same time they should be easy to read and should not dazzle the eye, or trouble the intellect of the reader by eccentricity of form in the letters. I have always been a great admirer of the calligraphy of the Middle Ages, and of the earlier printing which took its place. As to the fifteenth...
Page 498 - For this is the Great Story of the North, which should be to all our race what the Tale of Troy was to the Greeks to all our race first, and afterwards, when the change of the world has made our race nothing more than a name of what has been a story too then should it be to those that come after us no less than the Tale of Troy has been to us.
Page 369 - The dullest genius cannot fail To find the moral of my tale : That the distinguish'd part of men, With compass, pencil, sword, or pen, Should in life's visit leave their name, In characters, which may proclaim, That they with ardour strove to raise At once their arts, and country's praise; And in their working took great care, That all was full, and round, and fair.
Page 294 - Parliament is not a congress of ambassadors from different and hostile interests; which interests each must maintain, as an agent and advocate, against other agents and advocates; but Parliament is a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole; where, not local purposes, not local prejudices, ought to guide, but the general good, resulting from the general reason of the whole.
Page 96 - Fresh power to commune with the invisible world, And hear the mighty stream of tendency Uttering, for elevation of our thought, A clear sonorous voice, inaudible To the vast multitude ; whose doom it is To run the giddy round of vain delight, Or fret and labour on the Plain below.

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