Journal of the Northampton Natural History Society and Field Club, Volume 26

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Northampton Natural History Society, 1881
 

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Page 215 - I speak not, because they are field flowers ; but those which perfume the air most delightfully, not passed by as the rest, but being trodden upon and crushed, are three, that is, burnet, wild thyme, and watermints ; therefore you are to set whole alleys of them, to have the pleasure when you walk or tread.
Page 269 - Like a rose embowered In its own green leaves, By warm winds deflowered, Till the scent it gives Makes faint with too much sweet these heavywinged thieves. Sound of vernal showers On the twinkling grass, Rain-awakened flowers, All that ever was Joyous and clear and fresh, thy music doth surpass.
Page 217 - My Lord of Ely, when I was last in Holborn, I saw good strawberries in your garden there : I do beseech you send for some of them.
Page 239 - And there's yet another thing; in the one little particular of scolding— just good, clean, out-and-out scolding— a bluejay can lay over anything, human or divine. Yes, sir, a jay is everything that a man is. A jay can cry, a jay can laugh, a jay can feel shame, a jay can reason and plan and discuss, a jay likes gossip and scandal, a jay has got a sense of humor, a jay knows when he is an ass just as well as you do— maybe better. If a jay ain't human, he better take in his sign, that's all....
Page 183 - The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou nearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth ; so is every one that is born of the Spirit.
Page 203 - The monarch oak, the patriarch of the trees, Shoots rising up, and spreads by slow degrees ; Three centuries he grows, and three he stays, Supreme in state, and in three more decays...
Page 238 - You may call a jay a bird. Well, so he is, in a measure — because he's got feathers on him, and don't belong to no church, perhaps; but otherwise he is just as much a human as you be.
Page 274 - Thy scatter'd blossoms' lonely light, And have my inmost heart receive The influence of that sight. I love at such an hour to mark Their beauty greet the night-breeze chill, And shine, 'mid shadows gathering dark, The garden's glory still.
Page 217 - The strawberry grows underneath the nettle; And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best Neighbour'd by fruit of baser quality...
Page 271 - Last May we made a crown of flowers: we had a merry day; Beneath the hawthorn on the green they made me Queen of May; And we danced about the may-pole and in the hazel copse, Till Charles's Wain came out above the tall white chimney-tops.

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