History of the Rebellions in Scotland, Under the Marquis of Montrose, and Others, from 1638 Till 1660

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Constable & Company and Hurst, Chance, & Company, London, 1828 - 330 pages

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Page 129 - And Saul said, They have brought them from the Amalekites: for the people spared the best of the sheep and of the oxen, to sacrifice unto the Lord thy God ; and the rest we have utterly destroyed.
Page 207 - I'll never love thee more. As Alexander I will reign, And I will reign alone ; My thoughts did evermore disdain A rival on my throne. He either fears his fate too much, Or his deserts are small, Who dares not put it to the touch, To gain or lose it all.
Page 129 - And the people said unto Samuel, Who is he that said, Shall Saul reign over us? bring the men, that we may put them to death. 13 And Saul said, There shall not a man be put to death this day: for to-day the Lord hath wrought salvation in Israel.
Page 241 - Let them bestow on every airth a limb, Then open all my veins that I may swim To Thee, my Maker, in that crimson lake ; Then place my parboiled head upon a stake, Scatter my ashes, strew them in the air.
Page 325 - I grow an old man, and feel infirmities of age marvellously stealing upon me. Would my corruptions did as fast decrease...
Page 271 - That because of their numbers, because of their advantages, because of their confidence, because of our weakness, because of our strait, we were in the Mount, and in the Mount the Lord would be seen ; and that He would find out a way of deliverance and salvation for us : and indeed we had our consolations and our hopes.
Page 325 - I have not leisure to write much. But I could chide thee that in many of thy letters thou writest to me, That I should not be unmindful of thee and thy little ones. Truly, if I love you not too well, I think I err not on the other hand much. Thou art dearer to me than any creature ; let that suffice.
Page 162 - ... throwing himself into the hands of the Scots before Newark. He then removed with the Scotch army to Newcastle, where a commission of lords and commons was sent down to lay before him propositions for peace; as to which, however, they had no authority to treat : on learning which Charles said, " Then, saving the honour of the business, an honest trumpeter might have done as much.
Page 208 - I'd weep the world to such a strain That it should deluge once again. But since thy loud-tongued blood demands supplies More from Briareus' hands, than Argus' eyes, I'll sing thy obsequies with trumpet sounds, And write thy epitaph with blood and wounds.
Page 240 - he was prouder to have his head fixed upon the top of the prison, in the view of the present and succeeding ages, than if they had decreed a golden statue to be erected to him in the market-place, or that his picture should be hung in the king's bed-chamber.

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