The Bibliographer's Manual of English Literature: Containing an Account of Rare, Curious, and Useful Books, Published in Or Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, from the Invention of Printing : with Bibliographical and Critical Notices, Collations of the Rarer Articles, and the Prices at which They Have Been Sold in the Present Century, Volume 2, Part 1

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Henry G. Bohn, 1858 - 3363 pages

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Page 656 - FAMILY EXPOSITOR; Or, a Paraphrase and Version of the New Testament : with Critical Notes, and a Practical Improvement of each Section.
Page 613 - The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner; Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an uninhabited Island on the Coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. With an Account how he was at last as strangely delivered by Pyrates. Written by Himself.
Page 729 - Elizabeth by the Grace of God Queen of England France and Ireland Defender of the Faith &c.
Page 597 - Cantus Songs and Fancies To Three, Four, or Five Parts, both apt for Voices and Viols. With a brief introduction to Musick, as is taught in the Musick-school of Aberdeen. The Third Edition, much Enlarged and Corrected. Printed in ABERDEEN, by JOHN FORBES...
Page 566 - COXE'S History of the House of Austria. From the Foundation of the Monarchy by Rhodolph of Hapsburgh to the Death of Leopold II., 1218-1792.
Page 582 - Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England, with Explanatory Observations on Armorial Ensigns, by James Dallaway, AM 4to.
Page 765 - The Gospels of the fower Euangelistes translated in the olde Saxons tyme out of Latin into the vulgare toung of the Saxons, newly collected out of Auncient Monumentes of the sayd Saxons, and now published for testimonie of the same at London.
Page 658 - An Epistolary Discourse, proving, from the Scriptures and the first Fathers, that the Soul is a Principle naturally mortal, but immortalized actually by the pleasure of God, to Punishment, or to Reward, by its Union with the Divine Baptismal Spirit. Wherein is proved, that none have the Power of giving this Divine Immortalizing Spirit, since the Apostles, but only the Bishops.
Page 705 - A Restoration of the ancient Modes of bestowing Names on the Rivers, Hills, Vallies, Plains and Settlements of Britain : not recorded by any Author.

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