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beneath those graces, and then contemplate perfection. I have won her.

“ But the difficulties ; let me not forget them. I resume : I meet this lady of incomparable beauty. Glances meet ; gentle words lend interpretation to conscious cheeks; souls mingle; hearts bud, &c.

“ But she is engaged; and she is watched; and M. Gramont is jealous. And she says her father persecutes her, though he is all smiles to me. Moreover, her father has very particular reasons for marrying her to Gramont, though he's a poor beggar; he will never consent to his dismissal. Well, what's to be done? Why we must join the hands of love without the paternal blessing.

“I shall need your aid, my dear Count; and should M. Gramont prove restive, I'll need your friendship further, of course. .

“ It will be wedded love in a cottage at first, as a matter of course; and then, our travels ended, Ringwood Hall shall bless our advent.

“ I shall be at the Chateau Valremy to-morrow, to discuss my plans. What a monk you have been lately! Are you meditating?

“ The plague of the thing is, that my venerable parent is constantly urging me to leave Paris. I promise in every letter ; but a protracted illness prevents fulfilment. Of course marriage will cure

me.

“ I am now about to write him a moral epistle, in answer to an admirable sermon with which he hath

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AN UNINTELLIGIBLE ALLUSION.

never

indoctrinated your pupil.

Between us,

I thought he could be half so psalmodious. I fancy my aunt-a pious, excellent soul-has reformed him. He insists on stern morality, whose necessity he urges as of paramount importance to a gentleman. Also he makes a hazy, unintelligible allusion to some 'coming bliss' in store for me; but does not condescend to state whether in this world or the next. I am for enjoying both, of course, and begin naturally with the first presented.

I fancy he has taken a serious fit of late ; you, according to your maxim, will conclude just the contrary from his moral philosophy.

“ Thus, my dear Count, in two days I start en route for the immortal city' (with Mrs. Devigne futura), a fit abode for love divine.'

“Inveterately thine,

“ LEONARD DEVIGNE.”

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THE REPLY.

66 MY DEAR FRIEND,

“I HASTEN to assure you that I shall be impatient to see you. Your letter astounds me; but I know you well, most specious of plotters! I know you well. Could I believe in the thing called human virtue, I would swear that you can imitate it most divinely. I love the pleasant strain of irony that pervades your despatch. So perfect it is, that once or twice I thought you in earnest.

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“I need not say that you may depend on my purse, body and soul. My servant has orders to wait for

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with my

you cabriolet.

66 Till to-morrow, and always,

6. Your faithful

" VALREMY."

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THE TEMPLE OF PLEASURE.

CHAPTER IX.

THE TEMPLE OF PLEASURE.

AGREEABLY to the appointment, Leonard started for the Chateau Valremy, the residence of his friend the count.

At the distance of a few leagues from Paris stood the chateau, on an eminence, with which and the surrounding scenery, it seemed to have been raised by the wand of a fairy queen.

The last league of the journey meandered over rising ground and depressions ; so that the Temple of Pleasure was, by these risings and depressions, alternately presented to view, and then invisible—a succession of hope and fruition.

In the immediate grounds, whithersoever the eyes ranged, some striking and emblematical object was offered to fancy by the refined and intellectual designer: a fountain, whose waters gushed from a perpetual spring, whilst statues of nymphs, hand in hand, seemed dancing around. It was the Fountain of Pleasure.

MONUMENTS AND INSCRIPTIONS.

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Not far off you beheld a mimic tomb, as of a child, over which the figure of a decrepit old man drooped, as in grief for that which, once lost, is lost

It was the tomb of Premature Decay. Perhaps the model of a cottage caught the eye. If you approached, you beheld within, the statue of a girl. You read an inscription on the pedestal :

for ever.

C'est LUCILLE.

PREMIER AMOUR, DERNIER MALHEUR !

In the rear of this monument was the recumbent statue of a man in a priest's cassock, a vulture gnawing his breast. The inscription was :

CHRISTOPHE BRAMAND.

JESUITE INFAME !

Thus, on every side, a thought, a sentiment, or an emotion, by some voluptuous embodiment or delicate emblem, surprised and delighted.

Grouped according to their several habits of growth and tint of foliage, the various trees that adorned the rising grounds or studded the slopes, whether clothed in summer or bare in winter, relieved the distant landscape.

In the front of the chateau, borders and vases, in every variety of shape and material, interspersed with fountains and statues, were seen from the hall,

I

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