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PERSONS REPRESENTED.

DUKE OF VENICE.

Appears, Act I. sc. 3.
BRABANTIO, a senator; father to Desdemona.
Appears, Act I. sc. 1; sc. 2; sc. 3.

Two other Senators.

Appear, Act I. sc. 3.
GRATIANO, brother to Brabantio.

Appears, Act V. sc. I; sc. 2.

LODOVICO, kinsman to Brabantio.
Appears, Act IV. sc. 1; sc. 3. Act V. sc. 1; sc. 2.

OTHELLO, the Moor.
Appears, Act I. sc. 2; sc. 3. Act II. sc. 1; sc. 3.
Act III. sc. 2; sc. 3; sc. 4. Act IV. sc. 1; sc. 2; sc. 3.

Act V. sc. 1; sc. 2.

Cassio, lieutenant to Othello. Appears, Act I. sc. 2. Act II. sc. 1; sc. 3. Act III. sc. 1; sc. 3; sc. 4.

Act IV. sc. 1. Act V. sc. l; sc. 2.

Iago, ancient to Othello.
Appears, Act I. sc, 1; sc. 2; sc. 3. Act II. sc. 1; sc. 3.
Act III. sc. 1; sc. 2; sc. 3; sc. 4. Act IV. sc. 1; sc. 2. Act V. sc. 1; sc. 2.

RODERIGO, & Venetian gentleman.
Appears, Act I. sc. 1; sc. 2; sc. 3. Act II. sc. 1; sc. 3.

Act IV. sc. 2. Act V. sc. 1.
MONTANO, Othello's predecessor in the government of Cyprus.
Appears, Act II. sc. l; sc. 3. Act V. sc. 2.

Clown, servant to Othello.
Appears, Act III. sc. l; sc. 4.

Herald.
Appears, Act II. sc. 2.

DESDEMONA, wife to Othello.
Appears, Act I. sc. 3. Act II. sc. 1; sc. 3. Act III. sc. 3; sc. 4.
Act IV. sc. l; sc. 2; sc. 3. Act V. sc. 2.

EMILIA, wife to Iago.
Appears, Act II. sc. 1. Act III. sc. 1; sc. 3; sc. 4.
Act IV. sc. 2; sc. 3. Act V. sc. 1; sc. 2.

Bianca, a courtezan.
Appears, Act III. sc. 4. Act IV. sc. 1. Act V. sc. 1.

SCENE,-FOR THE FIRST Act, in VENICE ; DURING THE REST OF THE PLAY,

AT A SEA-PORT IN CYPRUS.

On the 6th of October, 1621, Thomas Walkley entered at Stationers' Hall, The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice.' In 1622 Walkley published the edition for which he had thus claimed the copyright. It is, as was usual with the separate plays, a small quarto. It is by no means certain to our minds that Walkley's edition was published before the folio. The usual date of that edition is 1623; but there is a copy in existence bearing the date of 1622. We have, however, no doubt that the copy of Othello' in the folio was printed from a manuscript copy, without reference to the quarto. The folio edition is regularly divided into acts and scenes ; the quarto edition has not a single indication of any subdivision in the acts, and omits the division between Acts II. and III.

The folio edition contains 163 lines which are not found in the quarto, and these some of the most striking in the play: the number of lines found in the quarto which are not in the folio do not amount to ten. The quarto, then, has not the inerit of being the fuller copy. Believing the folio to be the more genuine copy, our text, for the most part, follows that authority.. There is a quarto edition of 1630, which differs, in some readings, from both of the previous editions.

OTHELLO.

ACT I.

SCENE 1.-Venice. À Street.

Enter RODERIGO and Iago.

ream

a

Rod. Never tell me, I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.

Iago. But you 'll not hear me. If ever I did
Of such a matter, abhor me.

ROD. Thou told'st me, thou didst hold him in thy hate.
Iago. Despise me, if I do not. Three great ones of the

city,
In personal suit to make me his lieutenant,
Off-capp'd to him : and, by the faith of man,
I know my price, I am worth no worse a place :
But he, as loving his own pride and purposes,
Evades them, with a bombast circumstance,
Horribly stuff'd with epithets of war ;
And, in conclusion,
Nonsuits my mediators. For, certes, says he,
I have already chose my officer.
And what was he ?
Forsooth, a great arithmetician,
One Michael Cassio, a Florentine,
A fellow almost damn'd in a fair wife,
That never set a squadron in the field,
Nor the division of a battle knows
More than a spinster ; unless the bookish theorick,
Wherein the toged consuls can propose
As masterly as he : mere prattle, without practice,

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