The Life and Correspondence of Thomas Arnold, D.D., Late Head-master of Rugby School and Regius Professor of Modern History in the University of Oxford

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C. Scribner's sons, 1910

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Contents

LETTERS
174
Use of Images
178
To Rev J Hearn Rest of Parish contrasted with Anxiety
187
Intellectual Advance on coming to Rugby His Views
200
CHAPTER V
219
To Archdeacon Hare Niebuhr Coleridge Thirlwalls
220
To Rev J Lowe Pamphlet Clergy and Statesmen
225
To Rev G Cornish Domestic Happiness Pamphlet
233
210
254
To W Balston Esq On the Death of his son H Balston 217
260
To W W Hull Esq Englishmans Register Thucydides
264
J P Gell Esq Van Diemens Land Rugby Life
266
Public Affairs
273
To Rev A P Stanley Plan for Lectures
281
To J Coleridge Esq Libel in John Buli
283
To Rev Dr Hawkins Influence of Jews Church and State
287
Reasons for writing
301
To W Smith Esq Unitarians In what sense Christians
308
To Lady Cavan The Right Use of the Fourth Commandment
315
Episcopacy
338
French Geology Feudal Castles
358
Pantheon S Stephano Rotondo Martyrs
369
To J T Coleridge Esq Christian Year Roman History
11
LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE SEPTEMBER 1835 TO NOVEMBER 1838
13
To Rev Dr Hawkins On the same
15
To Rev G Cornish Prevalence of Intellectual Activity united
17
Papal Government
19
To Rev E Hawkins Election at Rugby
23
To Rev Dr Hawkins The same Idea of an Establishment 25
25
To the Archbishop of Dublin Failure of Englishmans Reg
28
To Rev F C Blackstone Laleham and Rugby
29
sity Religion and Politics Roman History 31
31
To W W Hull Esq Contrast of Private Happiness with
34
To the same The same 124 To Rev J Hearn Youth and Old Age Dr Hampden and 37
37
To the Lady F Egerton On the Conversion of an Atheist 276
41
To Rev J C Hare Declaration for the Admission of Dissent
44
To Rey J E Tyler Collection of Sermons
47
CHAPTER VI
61
To J T Coleridge Esq Choice of a Profession 63
63
pretation of Scripture
67
To Rev G Cornish Winter at Fledborough 69
69
To Rev Dr Hawkins Tracts for the Times Episcopacy
75
To H Balston Esq Advice on Composition
78
To Chevalier Bunsen Roman History Illyrians Physi
84
To Rev G Cornish Settlement at Rugby
86
To Rev J C Hare Plan of a Theological Review
90
92
92
To G Pryme Esq M P College Fines Oaths Halls
154
To Rev it Hill Thucydides Rome Ordination
160
To J C Platt Esq Newspapers Tour in France Se
166
To A H Clough Esq Oxford Scenery
172
London to Rugby
175
LETTERS
178
To Rev Dr Hawkins Oxford Examinations Physical Sci
184
To Susannah Arnold Public Affairs
187
To A P Stanley Esq Restoration of Deacons
192
To an Old Pupil
196
To Mr Justice Coleridge Legal Decision on the Founda
198
To Mr Justice Coleridge South of France Spanish Man
204
To H Balston Esq Liveliness necessary for a School
210
To J C Platt Esq Lecture for Mechanics Institutes
216
7 To Rev Dr Hawkins Pamphlet On Roman Catholic
223
To Rev H Fox Call to a Missionary Life
224
To the Parent of a Pupil holding Unitarian Opinions 230
230
To J P Gell Esq Van Diemens Land Sacred Names 189
236
To Rev H Balston Consumption Responsibility
242
Prospects of Theology
246
To Archdeacon Hare Sermons on Victory of Faith
248
To Rev Augustus Hare Public Affairs Old Testament
256
To Rev Dr Hawkins Offer to resign the Professorship 266
266
To the same
268
To Rev J Hearn Fever at Rugby Return of Mr Tucker 235
275
280
280
286
286
To Rev H Hill Stay in Oxford
295
To Rev Dr Hawkins Terminal Lecture Carlyles Visit 274
302
CHAPTER III
308
Selection of Subjects for School Exercises
309
Comparison of Scotch and English Education
317
To Chevalier Bunsen Death of Niebuhr Italy First News
318
Roman Churches
323
V
329
by a
336
ence
337
Prospects for England
342
VII
343
IX
349
To Sir T S Pasley Bart Comparative Advantages of Pri
361
General Views during his last Year
387
Prospects for France Return
389
Desire for Peace and for Positive Truths Lecture on the Divis
394
LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE JANUARY 1833 TO SEPTEMBER 1835
396
LIST OF WORKS
397
Contrast of English and Italian Peasaộtry
399

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Page 111 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because ye build the tombs of the prophets, and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous, and say, If we had been in the days of our fathers, we would not have been partakers with them in the blood of the prophets.
Page 149 - When thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.
Page 196 - Peter therefore went forth and that other disciple and came to the sepulchre. So they ran both together : and the other disciple did outrun Peter, and came first to the sepulchre. And he, stooping down, and looking in, saw the linen clothes lying; yet went he not in.
Page 311 - If I had not come and spoken unto them, they had not had sin ; but now they have no cloak for their sin.
Page 112 - It is not necessary that this should be a school of three hundred, or one hundred, or of fifty boys ; but it is necessary that it should be a school of Christian gentlemen.
Page 289 - If ye endure chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not ? But if ye be without chastisement, whereof all are partakers, then are ye bastards, and not sons.
Page 43 - Iv irapfpyta'. wherefore, rather than have it the principal thing in my son's mind, I would gladly have him think that the sun went round the earth, and that the stars were so many spangles set in the bright blue firmament.
Page 54 - ... delivered. 7 Our help standeth in the Name of the Lord : who hath made heaven and earth. Psal. cxxv. Qui confidant. HEY that put their trust in the Lord shall be even as the mount Sion : which may not be removed, but standeth fast for ever. 2 The hills stand about Jerusalem : even so standeth the Lord round about his people, from this time forth for evermore.
Page 50 - Every pupil was made to feel that there was a work for him to do that his happiness as well as his duty lay in doing that work well. Hence an indescribable zest was communicated to a young man's feeling about life ; a strange joy came over him on discovering that he had the means of being useful...
Page 59 - The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ ? For we being many are one bread, and one body : for we are all partakers of that one '.bread,

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