The works of Thomas Reid, with selections from his unpublished letters. Preface, notes and suppl. dissertations by sir W. Hamilton. Prefixed, Stewart's Account of the life and writings of Reid

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Contents

Bit Tion VI Apology for metaphysical absurdities Sensation without a sentient a consequence of the theory of Ideas Consequences of this strange opi...
106
The conception and belief of a sentient being or Mind is suggested by our constitution Tltc notion of Relations not always got by Comparing the relat...
110
There is a quality or virtue in bodies which we call their Smell How this is connected in the imagination with the sensativn
112
Whether in Sensation the mind is Active or Passive
114
Or Tastimo
115
Variey of Sounds Their place and distance learned by Custom without reasoning
116
Of Natural Language
117
Of Heat and Cold
119
Of Natural Signs
121
Of Hardness and other Primary Qualities
123
Of Extension
125
Of the existence of a Material World
126
Of the Systems of Philosophers concerning the Semes
130
The excellence and dignity of this faculty
132
Sight discovers almost nothing which the Blind may not compre hend The reason of this
133
Of the Visible Appearances of objects
135
That Colour is a quality of bodies not a sensation of the mind
137
An inference from the preceding
138
That none of our sensations are Resemblances of any of the quali ties of bodies
140
Of visible Figure and Extension
142
Some Queries concerning Visible Figure answered
144
Of the Geometry of Visibles
148
Of the Parallel Motion of the eyes
152
Of our seeing objects Erect by inverted images
153
The same subject continued
156
Of seeing objects Single with two ey s
163
Of the laws of vision in Brute animals
166
Squinting considered hypothetically
167
Facts relating to Squinting
172
Of the effect of Custom in seeing objects Single
173
Of Dr Porterfields account of single and double vision
176
Of Dr Briggss theory and Sir Isaac Newtons conjecture on this subject
178
Of the Process of Nature in perception
186
Of the Signs by which we learn to perceive Distance from the eye
188
Of the Signs wed in other aoptired perceptions
193
Of the Analogy between Perception and the credit we give to Human Testimony
194
Conclusion Reflection upon the opinions of Philosophers on this subject
201
BESSAYS ON THE INTELLECTUAL POWERS OF MAN Dedication
216
Preliminary Chapter I Explication of Words
219
Principles taken for granted
230
Of Hypotheses
235
Of Analogy
236
Of the proper means of Knowing the operations of the mind
238
Of the difficulty of Attending to the operations of our own minds
240
Division of the powers of the mind
243
Of Social and Solitary operations of mind
244
The sentiments of Bishop Berkeley
281
Bishop Berkeleys sentiments of th nature of Lleas
287
The sentiments of Mr Hume
293
The sentiments of Anthony Arnauld
295
Reflections on tlte Common Tlteory of Ideas
298
XV Account of the system of Leibnitz
306
Of Sensation
310
Of tlte Objects of Perception and first of Primary and Second ary Qualities
313
Of other objects of Perevtion
319
Of Matter and of Space
323
Of the Evidence of Sense and of Belief in general
326
Of the Improvement of the Senses
331
Of the Fallacy of the Senses
334
Things obvious and certain with regard to Memory
339
Of Conception
360
Of Abstraction
389
Of Jddguest
413
Of Reasoning
475
ESSAY VIIIOf Taste
490
Of the Will
530
Of the Principles of Action
543
Of Morals
637
Of the Author
681
Oh Additions made to Aristotles Tfienry
697
Of the Last Analytics
705
E ESSAY ON QUANTITY
715
Introduction
721
Present State
732
Conclusion
738
The Universality ofthe philosophy ofCommon Sense or its general
742
The distinction of Presentative Intuitive or Immediate and
804
Errors of Reid and other Philosophrs in reference to the preced
812
D DISTINCTION OF THE PRIMARY AND SECONDARY QUALITIES
825
Of Perception in general 182
876
D CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS A HISTORY OF THE DOCTRINE
889
D OUTLINE OF A THEORY OF MENTAL REPRODUCTION
910
On the Correlation of Colour with Extension and Figure in visual
917
F ON LOCKES NOTION OF THE CREATION OF MATTER
924
I ON THE HISTORY OF THE TERMS CONSCIOUSNESS ATTENTION
940
KTHAT THE TERMS IMAGE IMPRESSION TYPE c IN PHILO
948
0 LOCKES OPINION ABOUT IDEAS
966
II Impossibility of reconciling Liberty and Prescience various
976
U ON SCIENTIA MEDIA
982
X ON THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CONCEPTIONS BEGR1FFE
986
POSTSCRIPT
990

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - Tis evident that all the sciences have a relation, greater or less, to human nature; and that however wide any of them may seem to run from it, they still return back by one passage or another. Even mathematics, natural philosophy, and natural religion are in some measure dependent on the science of man, since they lie under the cognizance of men and are judged of by their powers and faculties.
Page 279 - ... which he will find in the following treatise. It being that term which, I think, serves best to stand for whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a man thinks: I have used it to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking; and I could not avoid frequently using it.
Page 279 - It is evident the mind knows not things immediately, but only by the intervention of the ideas it has of them. Our knowledge therefore is real only so far as there is a conformity between our ideas and the reality of things.
Page 412 - Now, if we will annex a meaning to our words, and speak only of what we can conceive, I believe we shall acknowledge that an idea which, considered in itself, is particular, becomes general by being made to represent or stand for all other particular ideas of the SAME SORT.
Page 414 - ... all general ideas are nothing but particular ones annexed to a certain term, which gives them a more extensive signification, and makes them recall upon occasion other individuals, which are similar to them. As I look upon this to be one of the greatest and most valuable discoveries that has been made of late years in the republic of letters...
Page 371 - The dominion of man in this little world of his own understanding, being much-what the same as it is in the great world of visible things, wherein his power, however managed by art and skill, reaches no farther than to compound and divide the materials that are made to his hand, but can do nothing towards the making the least particle of new matter, or destroying one atom of what is already in being.
Page 426 - And something previous ev'n to taste 'tis sense : Good sense, which only is the gift of Heaven, And, though no science, fairly worth the seven : A light which in yourself you must perceive ; Jones and Le Notre have it not to give.
Page 44 - David littering up your house more and more with all the birds of the air, the beasts of the field...
Page 143 - I have here supposed that my reader is acquainted with that great modern discovery, which is at present universally acknowledged -by all the inquirers into natural philosophy : namely, that light and colours, as apprehended by the imagination, are only ideas in the mind, and not qualities that have any existence in manner. As this is a truth which has been proved incontestably by many modern philosophers, and is, indeed, one of the finest speculations in that science, if the English reader would...
Page 294 - I find I can excite ideas in my mind at pleasure, and vary and shift the scene as oft as I think fit. It is no more than willing, and straightway this or that idea arises in my fancy; and by the same power it is obliterated and makes way for another.

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