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grammar, writing, reading, and other good discipline, meet and convenient for them, for the honour of God.Now, my friends and neighbours, much as we must admire the zeal and activity which have of late years been shewn in the teaching of youth, I will candidly ask those among you, who have had sufficient opportunities to observe, whether the instruction given in many schools is, in fact, meet and convenient ? In the building about to be erected here, I have not the smallest reason for dreading that it will be otherwise. But I speak in the hearing of persons who may be active in the management of schools elsewhere; and they will excuse me for saying, that many are conducted at present so as to afford melancholy proof that the instruction is neither meet nor convenient for the pupils there taught, nor, indeed, for the human mind in any rank or condition of society. I am not going to say that religious instruction, the most important of all, is neglected ; far from it; but I affirm, that it is too often given with reference, less to the affections, to the imagination, and to the practical duties, than to subtile distinctions in points of doctrine, and to facts in scripture history, of which a knowledge may be brought oụt by a catechetical process. This error, great though it be, ought to be looked at with indulgence, because it is a tempting thing for teachers ụnduly to exercise the understanding and memory, inasmuch as progress in the departments in which these faculties are employed is most obviously proved to the teacher himself, and most flatteringly exhibited to the inspectors of schools and casual lookers on. A still more lamentable error, which proceeds much from the same cause, is an overstrained application to mental processes of arithmetic and mathematics; and a too minute attention to departments of natural and civil history. How much of trick may mix with this we will not ask, but the display of precocious intellectual power in these branches, is often astonishing; and, in proportion as it is so, may, for the most part, be pronounced not only useless, but injurious. The training that fits a boxer for victory in the ring, gives him strength that cannot, and is not required to be kept up for ordinary labour, and often lays the foundation of subsequent weakness and fatal disease. In like manner there being in after life no call for these extraordinary powers of mind, and little use for the knowledge, the powers decay, and the knowledge within drops off. Here is then not only a positive injury, but a loss of opportunities for culture of intellect and acquiring information, which, as being in a course of regular demand, would be hereafter, the one strengthened and the other naturally increased. All this mischief, my friends, originates in a decay of that feeling which our fathers had uppermost in their hearts-viz., that the business of education should be conducted for the honour of God. And here I must direct your at. tention to a fundamental mistake, by which this age, so distinguished for its marvellous progress in arts and sciences, is unhappily characterized-a mistake, manifested in the use of the word education, which is habitually confounded with tuition or school instruction; this is indeed a very important part of education, but when it is taken for the whole, we are deceived and betrayed. Education, according to the derivation of the word, and in the only use of which it is strictly justifiable, comprehends all those processes and influences, come from whence they may, that conduce to the best development of the bodily powers, and of the moral, intellectual, and spiritual faculties which the position of the individual admits of. In this just and high sense of the word, the education of a sincere Christian, and a good member of society upon Christian principles, does not terminate with his youth, but goes on to the last moment of his conscious earthly existence-an education not for time but for eternity. To education like this, is indispensably necessary, as co-operating with schoolmasters and ministers of the Gospel, the neverceasing vigilance of parents; not so much exercised in superadding their pains to that of the schoolmaster or minister in teaching lessons or catechisms, or by enforcing maxims or precepts (though this part of their duty ought to be habitually kept in mind), but by care over their own conduct. It is through the silent operation of example in their own well-regulated behaviour, and by

accustoming their children early to the discipline of daily and hourly life, in such offices and employment as the situation of the family requires, and as are suitable to tender years, that parents become infinitely the most important tutors of their children, without appearing, or positively meaning to be so. This education of circumstances has happily, in this district, not yet been much infringed upon by experimental novelties ; parents here are anxious to send their offspring to those schools where knowledge substantially useful is inculcated, and those arts most carefully taught for which in after-life there will be most need. This is especially true of the judgments of parents respecting the instruction of their daughters, which I know they would wish to be confined to reading, writing, and arithmetic, and plain 'needlework, or any other art favourable to economy and home-comforts. Their shrewd sense perceives that hands full of employment, and a head not above it, afford the best protection against restlessness and discontent, and all the perilous temptations to which, through them, youthful females are exposed. It is related of Burns, the celebrated Scottish poet, that once while, in the company of a friend, he was looking from an eminence over a wide tract of country, he said, that the sight of so many smoking cottages gave a pleasure to his mind that none could understand who had not witnessed, like himself, the happiness and worth which they contained. How were those happy and worthy people educated ? By the influence of hereditary good example at home, and by their parochial schoolmasters opening the way for the admonitions and exhortations of their clergy; that was a time when knowledge was perhaps better than now distinguished from smatterings of information, and when knowledge was more thought of in due subordination to wisdom. How was the evening before the Sabbath then spent by the families among which the poet was brought up? He has himself told us in imperishable verse. The Bible was brought forth, and after the father of the family had reverently laid aside his bonnet, passages of Scripture were read, and the poet thus describes what followed :

“ Then kneeling down to Heaven's Eternal King,

The saint, the father, and the husband prays;
Hope springs exhulting on triumphant wing,

That thus they all shall meet in future days:
There ever bask in uncreated rays,

No more to sigh or shed the bitter tear;
Together hymning their Creator's praise,

In such society, yet still more dear;

While circling time moves round in an eternal sphere." May He who enlightened the understanding of those cottagers with a knowledge of himself for the entertainment of such hope, “ who sanctified their affections that they might love Him, and put His fear into their hearts that they might dread to offend Him,”-may He who, in preparing for these blessed effects, disdained not the humble instrumentality of parochial schools, enable this of ours, by the discipline and teaching pursued in it, to sow seeds for a like harvest ! In this wish, I am sure, my friends, you will all fervently join ; and now, after renewing our expression of regret that the benevolent founder is not here to perform the ceremony himself, we will proceed to lay the first stone of the intended edifice.”

CHURCH LIVINGS. Copy of a letter from the Rev. Charles Simeon, of Cambridge, on the subject of purchasing livings with a view to secure a gospel ministry in the respective churches :

“I had got to the length of my tether, as you will readily iinagine with 21 livings in my possession. But being strongly urged to purchase the living of Bridlington with 6,000 souls, I broke my tether and bought it .... After having purchased it, five of those who had urged me to it, knowing how ill able VOL. IX.-May, 1836.

4 B

I was to bear the expense, sent me 1001. each, and two 501. each, and one anonymously 40l., and left me not above 140l. to pay. I felt this a call from God to know nothing of tethers, but to go to the utmost extent of my power, now that the corporation livings are on sale........Accordingly I devote to this blessed work 2,500l. and I send to a variety of places this proposal :-Collect amongst you one-half, and I will give the other half-or, if three persons will subscribe three-fourths, I will give one fourth, and the first presentation. Thus on the first plan my pittance will go as far as 5,0001., and on the second plan, as far as 10,000l. And then I say to any persons, Help me to enlarge my pittance; because every 1001. will, on the first plan, be equal to 2001., and on the second plan to 400l. If I could get from others 1,0001., it would not spare me one penny, but would enlarge my efforts to the amount of 4,0001. But behold, I have begun with Derby, and, (with the exception of Mr. Evans, who wishes to enlarge my sphere of operation) I have got but 1001., and that is from Mr. Cope. So that I shall have to sacrifice for that one place nearly one-half of my pittance, whereas I expected that the religious people there would gladly meet me half way. On receiving his letter I was almost ready to weep. Truly, for the most magnificent church in the county, there is only one person found to meet my offer of fixing the gospel there in perpetuity, or to give a shilling towards it, and thus all my glorious plans and prospects are defeated. . . ...had pledged myself to purchase the great living at Northampton at any price. But the vicar has written me word that the corporation in. tend to get, if they can, an act of Parliament to enable the bishop of Lincoln to add to it a valuable sinecure in the town; and in return for that, to have the nomination vested in him. Whether this will go forward I do not know. If it do, my intentions with respect to it will be frustrated. But should that be the case, I have my eye upon all the provincial towns, to spend all I can in securing the gospel to them........ I have actually sent to Bath my proposals, and if they be accepted, (Bath will sell for at least 5,000l., having five churches under it,) I shall have my poor pittance swallowed up by that alone. I wrote thither under the full persuasion that the people of Derby would meet me half way, instead of only giving one solitary hundred towards it....... What to do I know not. (All that I purchase will be committed to my trustees, as all my twenty-two livings are.) I think I must secure Derby, because of the immense importance of it. I will have four or five other places if I can get them, and get the means of fulfilling my engagements. Pray do for me all you can with any of your friends who are able to assist in this good cause. Any sums may be placed to my account at Smith, Payne, and Smith's, London, Oh that there were amongst religious people more zeal for God, and more love to immortal souls ! In all my livings I have no personal interest whatever. If I had never done more than purchase Cheltenham, I should be already well repaid for all the pains I have taken, and all the labour I have expended.”

(This letter well merits preservation.—Ed.]

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DR. CONQUEST'S PRIZE. The Hon. and Rev. Baptist Noel, and Dr. Pye Smith, after much prayer, and great labour and anxiety, have awarded the prize of one hundred guineas, offered by Dr. Conquest, for the best essay on the love of money. It will be published early in June, by Ward and Co., under the title of “ Mammon; or, Covetousness, the Sin of the Christian Church.” One of the adjudicators says of it, 'It is incomparably the best essay! I have seldom, if ever, read so interesting a work; it possesses peculiar charms of language and illustration.” Three others are designated as “the composition of minds of a superlative order." Both the adjudicators express an earnest desire that they also may be published. Dr. Conquest received altogether one hundred and forty-three essays, forty-one of which were written by clergymen of the church of England, thirty-one by dissenting ministers, fifteen by females, and fifty-six by laymen.

(This is really worth inserting.- Ep.]

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Bancos"and}

ELY

Huntingdon} from Lincoln

.

APPENDIX (A.) TO SECOND REPORT OF THE CHURCH COMMISSIONERS.
No. 1.-PROPOSED ARRANGEMENT OF ARCHDEACONRIES.

[Those in Italics are new.]
Archdeaconries.

Dioceses.

Archdeaconries.
Canterbury:

Northampton.

PETERBOROUGH
Rochester, from Rochester

Leicester, from Lincoln.
Middlesex.

rSt. Alban's

's?
London.

ROCHESTER

Essex from London.
Surrey.

Colchester
Winchester.

Sarum.
Wells.

SALISBURY

Wilts.
Bath.

Dorset, from Bristol.
Taunton.

Worcester.

WORCESTER
Chichester.

Coventry, from Lichfield.
| Lewes.

ST. ASAPR and

St. Asaph. (Ely.

BANGOR

Merioneth.

St. David's. from

Brecon.

ST. DAVID's
Sudbury, from Norwich.

Cardigan.
Exeter.

Carmarthen.
Totness.

Llandaff.

LLANDAFT
Cornwall.

Monmouth.
(Barnstaple.

York.
Gloucester.

YORK

East Riding.
Cirencester.

Cleveland.
Salop.

Durham.

DURHAM
Hereford.

Northumberland.
Derby.

Carlisle.

CARLISLE
1 Stafford.

Kendal.
Lincoln.

Chester.
CHESTER

Shrewsbury or Salop, from Lichfield.
Stow.
Nottingham, from York.

Manchester.

MANCHESTER
Norfolk.

Lancaster.
Norwich.

Richmond, from Chester,

RIPON
Suffolk.

Craven.
Oxford.
Berkshire, from Sarum.
Buckinghamshire, from Lincoln.

DOCUMENTS.

551

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No. 2.-Number of Benefices in each Diocess with a Population of 300 and up

wards, requiring Augmentation; and the Sums necessary to augment them, according to a SUPPOSED Scale, founded upon the Population; distinguishing those Benefices which are in Private, from those which are in Public, Patronage.

Collected from the Ecclesiastical Revenues Report.

300 and under 500 Population, 500 and under 2000 Population,

raise to £150 per annum. raise to £200 per annum.

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YORK

70

4599

38

2268

32

15,321

86

92 7742

2331 178

7579

TOTALS....

666 41,058 386 23,848 280 17,210 1564 122,873 744 60,031 820 62,842

* Under the head of Public Patronage are included all Benefices which are in the gift of the Crown--of any archbishop or bishop or other dignitary or officer of the church—of any corporation, ecclesiastical or lay--and of any rector whose patron comes under either of these descriptions,

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