The Life of James the Second, King of England, &c: Collected Out of Memoirs Writ of His Own Hand. Together with the King's Advice to His Son, and His Majesty's Will, Volume 1

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Page lxxiii - Of these the false Achitophel was first, A name to all succeeding ages curst : For close designs and crooked counsels fit, Sagacious, bold, and turbulent of wit...
Page 572 - He was the silentest and modestest man that was perhaps ever bred in a court. He had a clear apprehension, and despatched business with great method, and with so much temper that he had no personal enemies : but his silence begot a jealousy, which has hung long upon him.
Page 400 - The Dutch, during the Civil wars in England, had encroached on the English trade ; .... Sometime after, the king gave the duke a patent for Long Island, in the West Indies, and a tract of Land between New England and Maryland, which always belonged to the crown of England, since first discovered; and upon which the Dutch had encroached during the rebellion.
Page iii - The Life of James the Second, King of England, &c., collected out of Memoirs writ of his own hand. Together with the King's Advice to his Son, and his Majesty's Will. Published from the Original Stuart Manuscripts in Carlton House, by the Rev. JS Clarke, LL.B., FRS, Historiographer to the King, Chaplain of the Household, and LiBrarian to the Prince Regent,
Page lxxiii - Having spoken of what the lord lieutenant has done, I presume with the same truth to tell your lordships what he has not done. He never advised the breaking of the triple league ; he never advised the shutting up of the exchequer ; he never advised the declaration for a toleration ; he never advised the falling out with the Dutch and the joining with France : he was not the author of that most excellent position, Delenda est Carthago, that Holland, a Protestant country, should, contrary to the true...
Page lxxii - I have a tradition that, on his death, the admirers of that unfortunate man changed it to Soho, being the word of the day at the field of Sedgmoor .... The name of the unfortunate duke is still preserved in Monraouth-street.
Page 441 - Catholick religion in general, and in particular to those of it in England, if he might have such dispensation for outwardly appearing a Protestant, at least till he could own himself publicly to be a Catholick, with more security to his own person and advantage to them. But the good Father insisted, that even the Pope himself had not the power to grant it, for it was an unalterable doctrine of the Catholick Church not to do ill that good might follow.
Page 387 - ... which at first his majesty positively refused, and used many arguments to dissuad the duke from that resolution ; and not only his majesty but many of the duke's friends, and most especially some of his meniall servants, with a violent zeal opposed the match.
Page lxxii - Square. I have a tradition, that, on his death, the admirers of that unfortunate man changed it to Soho, being the word of the day at the field of Sedgemoor. The...
Page xvii - Mr Stapleton thought, if he had them at St Omer, he could, with small risk, convey them to England. It was therefore resolved, that they should be carefully packed up, addressed to a Frenchman, a confidential friend of Mr Stapleton, and remitted by some public carriage. Some other things were put up with the Manuscripts. The whole arrived without any accident, and was laid in a cellar. But the patriotism of the Frenchman becoming suspicious, perhaps upon...

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