An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie: Including Many of His Original Letters, Volume 1

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Brisban and Brannan, 1807 - 559 pages
 

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Page 306 - Man that is born of a woman Is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down : He fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not.
Page 498 - His studies had been so various, that I am not able to name a man of equal knowledge. His acquaintance with books was great; and what he did not immediately know he could at least tell where to find.
Page 543 - O, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven...
Page 191 - Reynolds,, who was the intimate and beloved friend of that great man ; the friend whom he declared to be " the most invulnerable man he knew ; whom, if he should quarrel with him, he should find the most difficulty how to abuse.
Page 351 - True wit is nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed; Something whose truth convinced at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.
Page 440 - The pale descending year, yet pleasing still, A gentler mood inspires; for now the leaf Incessant rustles from the mournful grove ; Oft startling such as, studious, walk below, And slowly circles through the waving air.
Page 530 - Tytler, William. An inquiry, historical and critical, into the evidence against Mary, queen of Scots, and an examination of the histories of Dr. Robertson and Mr. Hume, with respect to that evidence.
Page 79 - See the grisly texture grow, ("Tis of human entrails made,) And the weights, that play below, Each a gasping warrior's head. Shafts for shuttles, dipt in gore, Shoot the trembling cords along Sword, that once a Monarch bore, Keep the tissue close and strong.
Page 306 - Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away ! for, lo ! the winter is past, the rain is over and gone, the flowers appear on the earth, the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land. The fig-tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grapes give a good smell.
Page 367 - Standing on Earth, not rapt above the pole, More safe I sing with mortal voice, unchanged To hoarse or mute, though fallen on evil days, On evil days though fallen, and evil tongues; In darkness, and with dangers compassed round.

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