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Hermia had used no arts, no coquetry, to allure her lover from her ; for, as she expresses it, just after, in the same dialogue, .. . His folly, Helena, is no fault of minc. She had, indeed, happened to have done her an injury, but no wrong ; and therefore the forsaken maid fhews her justice in plaining her own ill fortune, only, without expressing the least manner of resentment against her unoffending rival.

Hermia, in the same scene, alludes to the magic power of love, which concenters all our ideas in one, making us prefer a cottage to a palace, and a desert to a grove, according to the situation or circumstances of the object of our affections. After having declared the purpose of Aying her country with her lover, she adds,

Before the time I did Lysander fee,
Seemed Athens like a Paradise to me.
O then, what graces in my love do dwell,

That he hach turned a heaven into hell ? And Helena, afterwards, carries on the same idea, Split in the following lines :

Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity.
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind;
And therefore is winged Capid painted blind;
Nor hath love's mind of any judgment taste :
Wings, and no eyes, figure unheedy haste,
And therefore is love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguiled.

Theseus too, in a passage of his speech, in the first Scene of the Fifth Act of this Play, accords with the above sentiinent :

While the lover all as frantic

Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt. And Shakespeare has hinted a moral, on this latter subject, with regard to irregular or ill-placed affection, as Dr. Warburton has justly observed, “ byly the « as fine a metamorphosis as any in Ovid,” in the last line of the following speech, in the second Scene of

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aia had ufed no arts, no coquetry, to allur er from her : for, as the expresses it, je the same dialogue,

His folly, Helena, is no fault of mine. 1, indeed, happened to have done her 2 |

ne her ut no wrong; and therefore the forsaken ma. er justice in plaining her own ill fortus Ethout expressing the least manner of rele: ainst her unoffending rival.

ia, in the same scene, alludes to the mag: f love, which concenters all our ideas in ox.

us prefer a cottage to a palace, and a dek ove, according to the situation or circumof the object of our affections. After hava

the purpose of Aying her country with be ne adds, e the time I did Lysander see, ed Athens like a Paradise to me. en, what graces in my love do dwell,

he hach turned a heaven into hell ? Helena, afterwards, carries on the same ich fancom ollowing lines : : es base and vile, holding no quantity, can transpose to form and dignity. Cooks not with the eyes, but with che mind; herefore is winged Capid painted blind; arh love's mind of any judgment taste : s, and no eyes, figure unheedy haste,

speech, herefore is love laid to be a child, de in choice he is fo oft beguiled.

Tefens. She the Fifth A&t of this Play, accords with a utiinent :

the lover all as frantic Celen's beauty in a brow of Egypt.

of A& the Second; the whole of which I Thall
transcribe here, in order to shew how juftly and
poetically he has pointed to the different effects of
paffion upon busy and contemplative minds, as well
as on idle and dislipated ones.

Oberon 10 Puck.
That very time I saw, but thou could't not,
Flying between the cold moon and the earth,
Cupid all armed : a certain aim he took
At a fair vestal, throned by the Weft ,
And loosed his love-Thaft smartly from his bow,
As it thould pierce a hundred thousand hearts.
But I might see young Cupid's fiery Thaft
Quenched in the chatte beams of the wat'ry moon,
And the imperial votress passed on,
In meiden miditation, fancy free.
Yet marked I where the bolt of Cupid fell;
It fell upon a little western flower,
Before milk-white, now purple with Love's wound,
And maidens call it Love in idleness.

ACT V. SCENE 1.
The deceptions of an enthusiastic or over-heated
fancy, with the vain terrors of a dejected mind, are
well described in part of the following speech; in
Which our author classes the lunatic, the lover, and the
polt, together; and might have taken in the fanatic
100, along with them, under the description of those,
Who, as he says, in the first part of the fame.

is too, in a passage of his speech, in the #

was with a

Have such feething brains,
Sach fhaping fantasies, that apprehend

More than cool reason ever comprehends.
befeui. Such tricks hath strong imagination,

That if it would but apprehend tome joy,
It comprehends some bringer of that joy ;
Or in the night imagining some fear,
How caly is a bush supposed a bear ?

mong the brief of Sports, as it is called, to be bited before Theseus, on his weddingday, this

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is the title of one :

hakespeare has hinted a moral, on this laste
vith regard to irregular or ill placed altri. Ama
Dr. Warburton has justly-observed, “” exhibi

a metamorphosis as any in Ovid," in is the f the following speech, in the second Scez

his is meant as a compliment to Queen Elizabeth.

C 2

The

. I'. "The thrice three Muses mourning for the death ' ; ; Of: Learningą, late decen jed in beggary'. .

.
Mr. Warton inagines this paffage to have alluded
to a poery of Spenser's, stiled The Tears of the Muses,
on the Neglext and Contempt of. Learning, sin bis time.
Though this was not properly, a complaint of that
age, only ; it has been so much the grievance of all
times, that it has, long since, obtained into a proverb,
As poor as a poet. ::

The case of such unfortunaie persons, ..
" Of those whom Phoebus, in his ire,

“ Hath blasted with poetic fire * is certainly very hard. Persons who apply their minds to letters, must unavoidably neglect their temporal concerns; and those who employ their time in the reformation or entertainment of the world, should be supported by it-Not by merely accidental and precarious emoluments, but upon fome more permanent foundation; like the Clergy, who have had a provision made for them, for the fame reafon as above; and the name of Clerk, tho' now appropriated to the latter, was formerly the cominon appellation of both. The honour of such an establishinent would be considerable to a State, blonde

and the expence but finall for the numbers are but · few..... ... . . ! . .

Theseus expresses a just sentiment in a prince, when Philostrace, the Master of his Revels, objects to his being present at a play, which the affections of the lowest rank of the Athenian citizens had framed for the celebration of his nuptials. . .99 Philoftrate. No, my noble Lord,

It is not for you. I have heard it over, . .

And it is nothing; nothing in the world ; - Unless yon can find sport in their intents,

Extremely ltretched, and conncd with cruel păin, *** 1. To do you fervice. . 07!

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Euses mourning for the death , e decko jed in beggary. nagineg this paffage to have allohers, itiled The Tears of the # Contempt of Learning, in his to - not properly a complaint of c: s been so much the grievance oi „ long since, obtained into a prow

uch unfortunaie persons, om Phæbus, in his ire,

with poetic fire, y hard. Persons who apply rs, must unavoidably neglect is erns; and those who employ . tformation or entertainment of be supported by it-Noc by me

precarious emoluments, bure manent foundation; like the Cle:

Tbifcus. I will hear that play:

For never any thing can be amiss,
When fimpleness and duty tender it.
Hippolita also makes the same objection, but
from a motive of humanity, only.

I love not to see wretchedness oercharged,

And duty in bis service perishing.
7"eseus. Why, gentle sweet, you shall see no such thing.
Hipolita. He says, they can do nothing in this kind.
I bejeusi The kinder we, 10 give them thanks for nothing,

Our sport ball be, to take what they mistake;
Ana what poor daty caninct da,
Noble respeit takes not in might, but merit.
Where I have come, great clerks have purposed
To greet me with premeditated welcomes ;
Where I have seen them thiver, and Icok pale,
Make periods in the midt of sentences,
Throttle their practised accent in their fears,
And, in conclusion, dumbly have broke off,
Not paying me a welcome. Trust me, Sweet,
Out of their filence yet I picked a welcome; .
And in the modesty of fearful duty,
I read as much, as from the rattling tongue
Of fucy and audacious eloquence.
Love, therefore, and tongue-tied fimplicity,
le leaft Speaks moft, so my capacity.

a provision made for them, for, above; and the name of Clerk, r. ed to the latter, was formerly *, ation of both. The honour of it. [ would be considerable to a S. e but small---fçr the numbers ar? :

I must here conclude my observations on this Play, with the above beautiful passage, as there does not appear to me to be any thing else, in the remainder of it, worthy to supply a reflection relative to the purposed scope or design of this work.

pos т я с R I PT,

refies a just sentiment in a pora, , the Master of his Revels, corfent at a play, which the affections of the Athenian citizens had srama. n of his nuptials. noble Lord,

I have heurd it over, ; nothing in the world;" id fport in their intents, ed, and conned with cruel pit,

This Play is perfectly picturesque, and resembles Some rich landscape, where palaces and cottages, huntsmen and husbandmen, princes and peasants, appear in the same scene together,

Swis.

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