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CRITICAL CONJECTURAL, AND
EXPLANATORY,

UPON THE

PLAYS OF SHAKSPEARE;

RESULTING FROM

A COLLATION OF THE EARLY COPIES,

WITH THAT OF

JOHNSON AND STEEVENS,

EDITED BT

ISAAC REED, Esq.

TOGETHER WITH

SOME VALUABLE EXTRACTS FROM HIE MSS.

OF THE LATE RIGHT HONOURABLE

JOHN, LORD CHEDWORTIT.

DEDICATED TO

RICHARD BRINSLEY SHERIDAN, Esq.
By E. H. SEYMOUR.
VOL. II

LONDON:

Printed by J. Wright, St. John's Square, Clerktimell;

For Lackington, Allen, And Co. J Longman, Hurst, Rees,
And Orme; F. And C. Rivington ; W. J. And J. Richard,
Son; Cuthell And Martin ! T. Egerton J R. Faulder;
Vernor And Hood; J. Carpenter; R. H. Evans; S.
Bagster; And J. Asperne.

/^ARVARcT UNIVERSITY! LIBRARY DEC 5 1960

UPON THE

PLAYS OF SHAKSPEARE.
JULIUS C.ESAR.

ACT I. SCENE I.

256. "Be not out with me."

i. e. Be not out of humour with me"; be not unkindly disposed towards me: the phrase is still current in Ireland.

258." There have sat"

This corrupt use of the imperfect past tense for the perfect, sitten, has become so general as to make propriety almost obsolete.

"That Tyber trembled," &c.

Insomuch that Tyber trembled, &c. as in Macbeth:

"—— There's one did laugh in his sleep, and

one cried murder, "That they did wake each other."

"■ Wzep your tears

"Into the channel, till the lowest stream "Do kiss the most exalted shores of all." VOL, ii. B

This thought, without the extravagance of the hyperbole, occurs in As You Like It:

"— Thus the hairy fool

"Stood on thaextremest verge of the swift brook, "Augmenting it with tears."

SCENE II.

S6l. "When Ccesar says, do this, it is perform"d."

"Sit lux et lux fuit."

263. Br. "I'll leave you."

This, like many other fragments, is evidently an idle interpolation; it is utterly useless to the sense and spirit of the dialogue, and disfigures the verse. The removal of this hemistic would obviate Mr. Steevens's anxiety about the prosody in what follows.

"/ have not from your eyes that gentleness, "And shew of love, as Iwas wont to have."

This mode of speech, the using "as," for that, is an abuse which our poet himself seems to have been prompt to reprehend, if I mistake not, the meaning of a passage in Coriolanus, where Menenius, railing at the citizens, says, "I find the ass (quibble upon ass and as) in compound, with the major part of your syllables."

"If I have veil'd.my look,

"I turri'the trouble of my countenance

"Merely upon myself."

I do not know what Brutus could mean by veiling his countenance; unless he wore a mask,

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