Life of Dr. Adam Smith

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Baldwin and Cradock, 1830 - 32 pages
 

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Page 22 - Little else is requisite to carry a state to the " highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism, but " peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice ; " all the rest being brought about by the natural course of
Page 28 - The liberal reward of labour, as it encourages the propagation, so it increases the industry of the common people. The wages of labour are the encouragement of industry, which-, like every other human quality, improves in proportion to the encouragement it receives.
Page 29 - He will accommodate, as well as he can, his public arrangements to the confirmed habits and prejudices of the people ; and will remedy, as well as he can, the inconveniences which may flow from the want of those regulations which the people are averse to submit to.
Page 10 - How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it.
Page 28 - That a little more plenty than ordinary may render some workmen idle, cannot well be doubted ; but that it should have this effect upon the greater part, or that men in general should work better when they are ill fed than when they are well fed, when they are disheartened than when they are in good spirits, when they are frequently sick than when they are generally in good health, seems not very probable.
Page 20 - Labour was the first price, the original purchase money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all the wealth of the world was originally purchased; and its value, to those who possess it, and who want to exchange it for some new productions, is precisely equal to the quantity of' labour which it can enable them to purchase or command.
Page 22 - Little else is requisite to carry a state to the highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism, but peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice; all the rest being brought about by the natural course of things. All governments which thwart this natural course, which force things into another channel, or which endeavour to arrest the progress of society at a particular point, are unnatural, and to support themselves are obliged to be oppressive and tyrannical.
Page 12 - ... principles we are led to advance those ends which a refined and enlightened reason would recommend to us, we are very apt to impute to that reason, as to their efficient cause, the sentiments and actions by which we advance those ends, and to imagine that to be the wisdom of man, which in reality is the wisdom of God. Upon a superficial view, this cause seems sufficient to produce the effects which are ascribed to it; and the system of human nature seems to be more simple and agreeable, when...
Page 20 - I should in another discourse endeavour to give an account of the general principles of law and government, and of the different revolutions which they have undergone in the different ages and periods of society; not only in what concerns justice, but in what concerns police, revenue, and arms, and whatever else is the object of law.
Page 27 - The discipline of colleges and universities is in general contrived, not for the benefit of the students, but for the interest, or more properly speaking, for the ease of the masters.

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