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LONDON:

R, CLAY, PRINTER, 7, BREAD-STREET-IIILE,

CHEAPSIDE.

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56

Page
Account of the Dutch Hamlet.... il

- the first tragedy in our
language....

244
a curious drama, called
the Babillard..

89
Actor's prayer.

314

Address

1

Adelphi, performance at, 20, 45,

77, 100, 301, 333

Advice to players

151, 184
Anecdote of Jane Shore

147
Mr. Farquhar

181
- Shuter

213
the celebrated Ricobini 245

Anecdotes of the French Stage..

30

Armin, Robert....

322
Artaxerxe3, .

244
Astley's, performance at, 80, 113,

173, 206, 236

Athenian laws respecting the drama 24

Bad Actor, a parody

32

Beggar's Opera..

249

Benefits.

152

Biographical Sketches 180, 312
Brunswick, a poem...

187
Coburg, performance at, 21, 46,

81, 140, 173, 206, 236, 302, 333

Coincidences and imitations, 47,

85, 217

Colman and Foote...

55

Colman's John Bull..

21

Considerations on the Drama.. 142

Consolation to Messrs. Price and

Kemble......

286

Corneille

315

Country Girl.

285

Covent Garden, performance at, 12,

41, 73, 104, 135, 239, 207, 295, 330

theatre, &c.

214

Cumberland, Mr., and the Jews. 56

Cumberland's British Theatre... 280

Mr., contradiction

of a widely circulated anecdote

relating to himself.

57

Dangerous experiment.

243

Devil in the theatre

59

Dissertation on ranting.

117
pantomime.

236
Dowton.....

310
Dramatic authors.

246

works lately published.. 58

Dr. Dodd's intention of becoming

a drainatist.....

247

Drury Lane fund dinner

55

Page

Drury Lane, performance at, 3, 33,

65, 97, 131, 257, 289, 325
Effects of gas on theatrical per-

formers and the audience. 302

English drama, ancient and modern

51, 87, 175

Opera House, 166, 198,

232, 273

Epilogue to Follies of Fashion 335

Thomas à Becket..... 341

Expenses of the theatres, estimate

the.

Explanation of a passage in Venice

Preserved...

88

Extracts from Mr. Lister's new
tragedy of Epicharis... 278

-the new comedy of
the First of May...

278
-Thomas à Becket... 337
Farquhar's apology for the stage..

90
Follies of Fashion

335

Foote's opinion of farces.. 243

Foreign intelligence.

224
French drama...

215

criticisms on Mathews and

Yates....

251

Gammar Gurton's needle..

252

Garrick's Richard.....

212
Garrick, Mrs. Cibber, and Quin, in
the Fair Penitent......

344
Gothic green room ...

243

Grand aquatic drama.

Haymarket...138, 161, 193, 225, 271

Historical deduction of the British

drama.

22

Huntley, Mr.

239
Hissed actor...

146

Hissing

212

-desirable.

286

Impromptu, by the celebrated

Burns.

2i3

Improvement of stage thunder. 181

Inconveniences of the stage in Gar-

rick's time.

242

Johnson's opinion of Macklin... 313

Julius Cæsar.

305

Kean, Mr.

315, 346

Kemble, Mr.

218

Fanny.

286

Kempe, William..

321
Late Mr. Hull..

249
Letters to the Editor, No. 1

146

No. 2.

186

of advice, No. 3..

308

M259731

344

TH

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Page
Quin, Garrick, Mrs. Cibber, and

Mrs. Pritchard
Remarks on the patent theatres... 141
Review of the Brunswick.

187
the House that Jack built 316
Reviews

119, 337
Revived drama of the Wanderer.. 314
Right of authorship.

183

Romeo and Juliet.— A distressing

situation...

307

Shakspeare's acting the Ghost.. 24

science.

140

Sheridan..

248

Sir Giles Overreach.

306
Song in Masaniello..

128

Thierna-na-Oge.

95

Songs in Peter the Great.

32

the Devil's Elixir

96

Spanish Friar and Queen Mary... 305

Surrey, performance at, 21, 46, 78,

111, 139, 172, 205, 235, 274, 304, 333

Theatrical journal, 3, 33, 65, 97,

131, 161, 193, 225, 257, 325

Fund dinner, Covent

Garden....

82

epistle from an itinerant
player to his friend.

Theatricals at the Hague

315

legacies.

306
Thomas à Becket

337
Thespian Gallery

218
Tragedy, comedy, &c. considered. 142
Various instances of the great esti.

mation in which the drama was

held by the ancielegi :..... 47
Vauxhall.

140, 207

Venice Preserved,

of.....

334

Vestris, Madame..

219

Voltaire on the Unities..

114

Walpole on tragedy:

307

Wallack, memoir of.

342

Weekes, Mr.

254

West London, performance at, 21,

46, 140, 304

Wood, memoir of

180

Young, Mr.

253

ре

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k

m

123, 158, 190, 222, 255, 287, 317, 347

man.

LIST OF ENGRAVINGS.
Mr. Farren and Mr. Liston, as Charles Mr. Wood and Miss Cawse, as Tom
the Twelfth and Adam Brock.

Tug and Wilhelmina, in the Water-
Mr. Young and Miss Phillips, as Ri-
enzi and Claudia.

Mr. T. P. Cooke and Miss Scott, as
Mr. Keeley as Wamba, Miss Byfeld William and Susan, in Black-eyed
as Rebecca, and Miss Goward as Lisette. Susan.

Mr. Harley and Mr. Weekes, as Sam- Miss Paton, as Rebecca, in the Maid
son and Dan O'Reilley.

of Judah.
Mr. Mathews and Miss Foote, as Miss Fanny Kemble, as Juliet.
Jonathan Oldskirt and Fanny, in Who Miss Nelson.
Wants a Guinea ?

Mr. Wallack, as the Brigand Chief.

ADDRESS.

gant and cl

THE Editors of the Dramatic Magazine will not occupy their reader's time, or endeavour to prepossess themselves in his favour, by plausible assurances of the care and attention with which they intend to carry on this publication : if the work be not entitled to support on its own merits, any eulogium of this nature will but render it doubly contemptible. Though they avoid this beaten track, they think it nessary to say something respecting it; and, as brevity is the soul of wit, they will endeavour to be as concise as possible. Few causes have tended more to raise the stage to its present repute, and the professors to their present affluence, than the ele

criticisms which Steele, Addison, and their friends introduced fi ime to time in the Spectator, Tatler, and other periodicals; for they not only corrected many errors that prevailed, and gave a firmness and respectability to the profession before unknown, but induced men of genius, such as Churchill, Lloyd, and many others, to devote their attention to the stage, by whose works we are enabled to gain some ideas of the style and manners of our departed actors; but though these works are eagerly sought after, they are far from affording so minute a statement as could be wished. Now had a Theatrical Review been established, giving an exact report of all theatrical proceedings, it would not only have been a great source of amusement to the public, but have proved of most essential service to the actor; for there are many minute circumstances in the exhibition of a character upon the stage, which do not appear from reading the poet, but must be supplied by the

B

3

player from his own observation of human life. These minute circumstances may be preserved in a Theatrical Review, as a gallery of pictures, in the dresses of the times, gives us a lively idea of the appearance of our ancestors.

“Life's moving picture, well-wrought plays," would be still more lively, if every peculiarity of manners in every trait of character were preserved; and if not retained by writing, many characteristic minutiæ must fade away with the age that gave them birth, and be totally lost to after-times.

The object of the Dramatic Magazine will be, therefore, to afford a complete history of the modern stage; but, in addition to this, the Editors purpose abridging from numerous publications a history of the British drama, including a biography of all the principal performers from its commencement.

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