Selections from Sir Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur

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Ginn, 1897 - 348 pages
 

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Page 310 - Then saw they how there hove a dusky barge, Dark as a funeral scarf from stem to stern, Beneath them ; and descending they were ware That all the decks were dense with stately forms Black-stoled, black-hooded, like a dream by these Three Queens with crowns of gold and from them rose A cry that...
Page 310 - But now farewell. I am going a long way With these thou seest - if indeed I go (For all my mind is clouded with a doubt) To the island-valley of Avilion; Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard-lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Page 308 - On one side lay the ocean, and on one Lay a great water, and the moon was full. Then spake King Arthur to Sir Bedivere: ' The sequel of to-day unsolders all The goodliest fellowship of famous knights Whereof this world holds record.
Page 310 - And flashing round and round, and whirl'd in an arch, Shot like a streamer of the northern morn, Seen where the moving isles of winter shock By night, with noises of the Northern Sea. So...
Page 295 - At last the Queen herself and pitied her : But Arthur spied the letter in her hand, Stoopt, took, brake seal, and read it ; this was all : "Most noble lord, Sir Lancelot of the Lake, I, sometime...
Page 310 - And to the barge they came. There those three Queens Put forth their hands, and took the King, and wept. But she, that rose the tallest of them all And fairest, laid his head upon her lap, And loosed the shatter'd casque, and chafed his hands, And call'd him by his name, complaining loud, And dropping bitter tears against...
Page 346 - This series is intended primarily for use in colleges and higher schools ; but it will furnish also to the general reader a library of the best things in English letters in editions at once popular and scholarly. The works selected will represent, with some degree of completeness, the course of English Literature from Chaucer to our own times. The volumes will be moderate in price, yet attractive in appearance, and as nearly as possible uniform in size and style. Each volume will contain, in addition...
Page 294 - Somtyme with the lord of Palatye, Ageyn another hethen in Turkye : And evermore he hadde a sovereyn prys. And though that he were worthy, he was wys, And of his port as meke as is a mayde.
Page xiii - I haue after the symple connynge that god hath sente to me / vnder the fauour and correctyon of al noble lordes and gentylmen enprysed to enprynte a book of the noble hystoryes of the sayd kynge Arthur / and of certeyn of his knyghtes after a copye vnto me delyuerd / whyche copye Syr Thomas Malorye dyd take oute of certeyn bookes of frensshe and reduced it in to Englysshe...
Page xiv - I am on lyue that god sende me good delyueraunce | & whan I am deed I praye you all praye for my soule | for this book was ended the ix yere of the reygne of kyng edward the fourth | by syr Thomas Maleore knyght as Ihesu helpe hym for hys grete myght | as he is the seruaunt of Ihesu bothe day and nyght |

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