The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters and Sculptors, Volume 1

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Page 157 - Farewell, great painter of mankind ! Who reached the noblest point of art, Whose pictured morals charm the mind, And through the eye correct the heart. If Genius fire thee, reader, stay, If Nature touch thee, drop a tear, If neither move thee turn away For Hogarth's honoured dust lies here.
Page 219 - The artists have instituted a yearly exhibition of pictures and statues, in imitation, as I am told, of foreign academies. This year was the second exhibition. They please themselves much with the multitude of spectators, and imagine that the English school will rise in reputation. Reynolds is without a rival, and continues to add thousands to thousands, which he deserves, among other excellencies, by retaining his kindness for Baretti.
Page 177 - Poussin, to achieve it. In the picture alluded to, the first idea that presents itself is that of wonder, at seeing a figure in so uncommon a situation as that in which the Apollo is placed ; for the clouds on which he kneels have not the appearance of being able to support him...
Page 53 - I only have transferr'd it to her Eyes. Such are thy Pictures, Kneller. Such thy Skill, That Nature seems obedient to thy Will: Comes out, and meets thy Pencil in the draught: Lives there, and wants but words to speak her thought.
Page 104 - ... some women from Ford; but he was not to tell what, or to whom. He walked out; he was followed; but somewhere about St. Paul's they lost him. He came back, and said he had delivered the message, and the women exclaimed, 'Then we are all undone!
Page 221 - ... not for a pecuniary prize. It cannot be denied or doubted, that all who offer themselves to criticism are desirous of praise : this desire is not only innocent but virtuous, while it is undebased by artifice, and unpolluted by envy; and of envy or artifice...
Page 104 - When he came up, he asked some of the people of the house what Ford could be doing there. They told him Ford was dead. The waiter took a fever, in which he lay for some time. When he recovered, he said he had a message to deliver to some women from Ford; but he was not to tell what, or to whom.
Page 270 - I reflect not without vanity, that these Discourses bear testimony of my admiration * Che Raffaelle non ebbe quest" arte da nutura, ma per lunyo studio. of that truly divine man, and I should desire that the last words which I should pronounce in this Academy, and from this place, might be the name of MICHAEL ANGELO*.
Page 90 - I entertained some hopes of succeeding in what the puffers in books call The Great Style of History Painting; so that without having had a stroke of this grand business before, I quitted small portraits and familiar conversations, and with a smile at my own temerity commenced historypainter, and on a great staircase at St. Bartholomew's Hospital painted two Scripture stories, the ' Pool of Bethesda ' and the
Page 234 - Here Reynolds is laid, and to tell you my mind, .He has not left a wiser or better behind : His pencil was striking, resistless, and grand : His manners were gentle, complying, and bland; Still bom to improve us in every part, His pencil our faces, his manners our heart...

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