The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 14

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Harper & Brothers, 1908
 

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Page 47 - Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return. What if her eyes were there, they in her head ; The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, As daylight doth a lamp ; her- eyes in heaven Would through the airy region stream so bright, That birds would sing, and think it were not night. See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand ! O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek ! Jul.
Page 50 - Thou mayst prove false; at lovers' perjuries, They say, Jove laughs. O gentle Romeo! If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully: Or if thou think'st I am too quickly won, I'll frown and be perverse and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo; but else, not for the world. In truth, fair Montague, I am too fond, And therefore thou mayst think my haviour light: But trust me, gentleman, I'll prove more true Than those that have more cunning to be strange.
Page 51 - I'll believe thee. Rom. If my heart's dear love Jul. Well, do not swear: although I joy in thee, I have no joy of this contract to-night: It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden, Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be Ere one can say 'It lightens.
Page 72 - These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die ; like fire and powder Which as they kiss consume : the sweetest honey Is loathsome in his own deliciousness, And in the taste confounds the appetite : Therefore, love moderately ; long love doth so Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
Page 33 - Tickling a parson's nose as a lies asleep, Then dreams he of another benefice : \ Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck, And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, Of healths five fathom deep ; and then anon Drums in his ear, at which he starts, and wakes ; 1 And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, And sleeps again.
Page 47 - s in a name ? that which we call a rose, By any other name would smell as sweet ; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, Retain that dear perfection which he owes, Without that title : Romeo, doff thy name ; And for that name, which is no part of thee, Take all myself.
Page 33 - O'er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream : Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues, Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are.
Page 32 - Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love ; O'er courtiers' knees, that dream on court'sies straight, O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees, O'er ladies...
Page 39 - Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this ; For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers
Page 47 - Tis but thy name that is my enemy; Thou art thyself though, not a Montague. What's Montague? it is nor hand , nor foot, Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part Belonging to a man. O, be some other name! What's in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet...

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