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1846.] The Chief Fathers of New England. 239 by the wiles of error, misnamed liberal Christianity, or that they would embrace the principles and imbibe the spirit of antichrist. Should not those who labor for our youth earnestly pray, that the spirit of our fathers may rest upon their children, so that our "sons may be as plants grown up in their youth, and our daughters as corner stones, polished after the similitude of a palace ?”

I have been led to these hasty thoughts by reading in the Well Spring of the present week, the notice of an application for a library, from a pastor in Litchfield county, Michigan, in which he expresses the desire that “their children may be taught the doctrines of the Puritan fathers.” As an individual, I am anxious that their call may be heeded, and as the agent of the Sabbath school of the first church in this place, I send you $15, which you will please apply to this particular object, and acknowledge as our “ Independence Offering." From this pastor and Sabbath school we should like to receive letters of acknowledgement, as it has a tendency to encourage the school to make greater effort in behalf of the needy.

The interest in our school still continues, though for some time past there have been no conversions. This interest has been the efficient cause of a considerable increase in the amount of our monthly contributions. You will, in the course of the year, receive further proof that your western effort, as well as the entire operations of your Society, are near our hearts.

Wishing you grace, and an abundant prosperity, I am still your fellow servant in the bonds of the gospel.

Aug. 29, 1846.

W. D. C.

“One moment! what an effect it produces upon years ! One moment! virtue, rapture, glory; crime, shame, woe rest upon it! Death itself is but a moment, yet eternity is its successor!”

A DYING MOTHER'S LOVE.

“ The plague broke out in a little Italian village. In one house the children were taken first; the parents watched over them, but only caught the disease they could not cure. The whole family died. On the opposite side of the way lived the family of a poor laborer, who was absent the whole week; only coming home on Saturday nights to bring his scanty earnings. His wife felt herself attacked by the fever in the night; in the morning she was much worse, and before night the plague spot showed itself. She thought of the terrible fate of her neighbors. She knew she must die, but as she looked upon her dear little boys, she resolved not to communicate death to them. She therefore locked the children into the room, and snatched her bedelothes lest they should keep the contagion behind her, and left the house. She even denied herself the sad pleasure of a last embrace.

O think of the heroism that enabled her to conquer her feelings, and leave home and all she loved, to die! Her eldest child saw her from the window. Good-by, mother,' said he, with his tenderest tone, for he wondered why his mother left him so strangely. Good-by, mother,' repeated the youngest child, stretching its little hand out of the window. The mother paused; her heart was drawn toward her children, and she was on the point of returning back; she struggled hard, while the tears rolled down her cheeks at the sight of her helpless babes. At length she turned from them. The children continued to cry, 'Good-by, mother. The sounds sent a thrill of anguish to her heart ; but she pressed on to the house of those who were to bury her. In two days she died, recommending her husband and children to their care with her last breath.

O that mothers were as careful not to impart the worse contagion of sin to their children ! ”

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Donations-continued from second page of cover. Nashua, N, II.- From Edmund Parker, Esq.,

25 00 Northboro',-“ Independence Ofering,' from the Sab. school, per Silas Haynes,

400 Norwich, C1---From Miss Julietta Betts' Sab. school class in 1st Church, Newbury.-From a Friend,

200 Northampton.—“Independence Offering,” from the Sab. school in 1st Ch., per Wm. D. Clapp,

15 00 O.cford, N. H.—“Independence Offering," from the Sab. school, in Conggregational Society, .

100 Providence, R. 1.-" Independence Offering," from Richmond st. Church, - 750 Collections in same, per T. Salisbury, sup't.,

12 50 Petersham.—“ Independence Offering," from S S. in Rev. Mír. Clark's Soc., 2 30 Phillipston.-- From the S. school in Rev. Mr. Perkins' Society, per Courtlon Sanderson,

· 10 00 Sunderland.–From the Sabbath school in Rev. Mr.Cary's Society, · 10 00 Salem.- Independence Offering,” from the S.sch. in Tabernacle Church, per John Dike, sup't.,

900 South Wilbrahom.-" Independence Offering," from Sab. school in Rev. Mr. Hazen's Society, per John W. Langdon, sup't.,

400 Sterling, C1.--" Independence Offering," from the Sab. school, per Jacob Allen,

1 00 South Dennis.-From the “ Juvenile Missionary Society,” per

Mrs. R. S.
Pettengill, -

10 00 Seekonk.–From the Sab, school in Rev. Mr. Barney's Society, per F. H. Weld, sup't.,

- 10 00 Southboro --From'a Friend,

25 Townsend.--" Independence Offering,” from the Sab. school in Rev. Mr, Sheldon's Soc., per John Proctor, Jr., sup't.,

10 00 West Medway.-From the Sab school in Rev. D. Ide's Society, per Elihu White,

12 30 Westfield - Independence Offering,” from the Sab, school in Rev, £, Davis' Society,

1 58 Woodstock, Cl.--From Mary Morse Fox, deceased,

2 50 West Hampton.--" Independence Offering," from Rev. Mr. Coggin's Soc., 550 West Barnstable.--" Independence Offering," from the Sab. school in Rev. Mr. Hayes' Society, per Walter Crocker,

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ton.

Review of Publications. The LIVES OF JOHN Wilson, John Norton, AND JOHN DAVENPORT, some of the chief fathers of New England. By A. W. MCLURE, BosMass. S. S. SOCIETY, 1816.

[From the Albany Spectator.] This is the second volume of one of the noblest series of works now being published in this land. It appeals directly to every friend and lover of the memory of our pilgrim fathers ; and in intrinsic worth as well as in typographic and mechanical beauty, is worthy of the cause it advocates. None who are true to their land, cannot but desire to see it widely circulated, and to entertain the hope that hundreds of copies will be demanded in this city, and thousands throughout the surrrounding country. We cannot give our readers a clearer idea of the design of this excellent series, than by quoting a part of the Preface.

“ To achieve the triumph for which we hope, and for which our fathers struggled, it is needful to keep alive their memory, and diffuse their principles. This volume is offered as an humble aid in this great work. As our fathers have been noisily charged with having a spirit of extreme bigotry, and unequalled intolerance; and as this charge more than any other, tends to impede the good influence of their principles and examples, it is thought best to meet il at once and for all. This will be found attempted at some length in the third chapter of the life of John Wilson. The rest of the volume is composed of biographical matter. It may be expected that this series will soon be extended by other volumes, from several writers, descriptive of the compeers of those good men who are commemorated here."

Is published monthly at No. 13 Cornhill, Boston. Terms, fifty cents per annum, in advance. When ordered from the Depository, to one address, every ninth copy gratis.

THE WELL-SPRING Is published weekly, at No. 11 Cornhill, Boston. Terms at the Depository.--Single copy, 35 cents; three copies to one address, $1; ten to one address, $3; twenty, or upwards, to one address, 25 cents a copy. From these terms there is no variation,-payable in all cases in advance.

Agents must make their payments within six months, for both works, or they will be discontinued at the discretion of the Publisher. Payments to be made to C. C. Dean, Treasurer.

RHODE ISLAND.

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AGENTS FOR THE VISITER.
MASSACHUSETTS.

Concord, Rufus Merrill,
Amherst, Sereno E. Bishop, Dover, E. J. Lane,
Amesbury, Eli B. Howard,

Keene, Abijah Kingsbury, Andover, David Garland.

Manchester, Asa 0. Colby, Ashby, Jonas Patch,

Nashua, J. Buffum,
Attleborough, C. Carpenter, Portsmouth, W. B. Lowd.
Braintree, Wm. Thayer,

VERMONT.
Dedham, S. Parish, C. E. Morse,
Dorchester Village, J. V. Marshall

, St. Johnsbury, A. G. Chadwick,

Brattleborough, A. E. Dwinell,
Fitchburgh, Dea. A. Thurston,

Windsor, Bishop & Tracy.
Framingham, Boynton & Marshall,
Greenfield, Wm. Elliot,
Groton, Dea. C. Lawrence, Newport, Ephraim Sheldon,
Lowell, Samuel B. Simonds. Providence, I. Wilcox & Co.,
Milton Bonney,

J. G. Rawson,
Manchester, John Price,

S. S. Depos. 124 Westminster St Methuen, Wm. Thaxter, New Bedford, C. Davenport,

CONNECTICUT.
Newburyport, C. Whipple,

Hartford, Charles Hosmer,
J. G. Tilton,

New Haven, Wm. Stebbins,
Northampton, Stoddard & Lathrop, Norwich, Safford & Park.
Pittsfield, Little & Werden,

NEW YORK Plymouth, W. S. Bartlett,

Albany, E. H. Pease, Salem, Henry Whipple,

N, York city, M. W. Dodd,
Springfield, G. & C. Merriam,

Troy. Young & Hartt.
Taunton, P. W. Dean,
Townsend, Dea. Joel Adams,

PENNSYLVANIA.
Westfield, A. G. Chadwick, Philadelphra, Wm H. Flint,
Williamstown, E. Kellogg,

VIRGINIA.
Worcester, S. A. Howland.

Lynchburg, Peleg Seabury.
MAINE.

ILLINOIS.
Bangor, W. Lewis & Co., Lower Alton, J. A. Willard.
Bath, Henry Hyde,

OHIO.
Portland, Hyde, Lord & Duren.

Cincinnati, George L. Weed.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.

MISSOURI.
Amherst, John Prince,

St. Louis, T. H. Knox.

66

210

The Dying NIother's Love.

(Oct.

A DYING MOTHER'S LOVE.

“The plague broke out in a little Italian village. In one house the children were taken first; the parents watched over them, but only caught the disease they could not cure. The whole family died. On the opposite side of the way lived the family of a poor laborer, who was absent the whole week; only coming home on Saturday nights to bring his scanty earnings. Ilis wise fel: herself attacked by the fever in the night; in the morning she was much worse, and before night the plague spot showed itself. She thought of the terrible fate of her neighbors. She knew she must die, but as she looked

upon her dear little boys, she resolveā not to communicate death to them. She therefore locked the children into the room, and snatched her bedclothes lest they should keep the contagion behind her, and left the house. She even denied herself the sad pleasure of a last embrace.

O think of the heroism that enabled her to conquer her feelings, and leave home and all she loved, to die! Her eldest child saw her from the window. "Good-by, mother, ' said he, with his tenderest tone, for he wondered why his mother left him so strangely. "Good-by, mother,' repeated the youngest child, stretching its little hand out of the window. The mother paused; her heart was drawn toward her children, and sie was on the point of returning back; she struggled hard, while the tears rolled down her cheeks at the sight of her helpless babes. At length she turned from them. The children continued to cry, 'Good-by, mother. The sounds sent a thrill of anguish to her heart; but she pressed on to the house of those who were to bury her. In two days she died, recommending her husband and children to their care with her last breath.

O that mothers were as careful not to impart the worse contagion of sin to their children!”

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