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" I saw his sieves purfiled at the bond With gris, and that the finest of the lond. And for to fasten his hood under his chinne, He hadde of gold ywrought a curious pinne : A love-knotte in the greter end ther was. His bed was balled, and shone as any glas,... "
The Works of Walter Scott, Esq: Sir Tristram - Page 301
by Walter Scott - 1813
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Sir Tristrem; a metrical romance, ed. by W. Scott

Thomas (of Ercildoune, called the Rhymer.) - 1804
...birth-place of King Arthur. See p. 206. Fowe and grits. — P. 77. st. 9. Fowe, from the French faurure, signifies furs in general ; Griis a particular kind...the bond, With gris, and that the finest of the lond *. In the beautiful Lay of Launfal, the mantles of the fairy damsels were of green felwet, Ybordured...
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Sir Tristrem: A Metrical Romance of the Thirteenth Century

Thomas (the Rhymer) - 1811 - 401 pages
...birth-place of King Arthur. Seep. 210. Fame and grit's. — P. 81. st 9. Fowe, from the French faurure, signifies furs in general ; Griis a particular kind...at the bond, With gris, and that the finest of the loud.* * From a passage of Bromton we learn, that the ikin of the wild cat was used by the clergy....
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Sir Tristrem: A Metrical Romance of the Thirteenth Century

Thomas (the Rhymer) - 1819 - 401 pages
...birth-place of King Arthur. See p. 210. Fowe and grits. — P. 81. st. 9. Fowe, from the French, foumre, signifies furs in general ; Griis a particular kind...esteem. The Monk of Chaucer had — — his sleeves put-filed, at the bond, With gris, and that the finest of the lond.* In the beautiful Lay of Launfal,...
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The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, Baronet, Volume 4

Walter Scott - 1821
...of Tintagel, renowned in romance as the birth-place of King Arthur. See p.' 210. Fowe andgriis. — P. 81. st. 9. Fowe, from the French, fourure, signifies...The Monk of Chaucer had his sleeves purfiled, at the hond, With gris, and that the finest of the lond.t In the beautiful Lay of Launfal, the mantles of...
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The Bardiad: A Poem in Two Cantos

Charles Burton - 1823 - 80 pages
...and of hunting for the hare Was all his lust, for no cost wolde he spare. I saw his sieves purtiled at the bond With gris, and that the finest of the lond. And for to fasten his hood under his chinne, He hadde of gold ywrought a curious pinne: A love-knotte...
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Select British Poets, Or, New Elegant Extracts from Chaucer to the Present ...

William Hazlitt - 1824 - 822 pages
...pricking, and of hunting for the hare Was all his lust; for no cost wolde he spare. I saw his sieves unties, which our Nourisher, from whom All perfect good, unmeasu And, for to fasten his hood, under his chinnc He hadde, of gold ywrought, a curious pinne, — A love-knotte...
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The Poetical Rhapsody: to which are Added Several Other Pieces ...

Francis Davison - 1826 - 265 pages
...same term appears to be applied to that animal, in the Canterbury Tales : " I saw his sieves purfited at the bond With gris, and that the finest of the lond." Mr. Tyrwhitt states that he is not clear what species of fur was meant : but the following passage...
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Select Works of the British Poets: From Chaucer to Jonson

Robert Southey - 1831 - 1016 pages
...pricking and of hunting for the hartWas all his lust, for no cost wolde he spare« I saw his sieves that infernall monster, having kest His wearie foe into that li And for to fasten his hood under his chinne, He hadde of gold ywrought a curious pinne : A love-knotte...
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The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott: First Series, Containing Minstrelsy ...

Sir Walter Scott - 1838 - 532 pages
...birthplace of King Arthur. See p. 572. I .*...:• and gills.-P. 343, St. 9. Fowe, from the French fotirnre, signifies furs in general ; Griis, a particular kind...from its grey colour. The words occur repeatedly in Ihe poem. Grlis was in high esteem. The Monk of Chaucer had " his sleeves purQIed, at the bond, w.iii...
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The History of English Poetry: From the Close of the Eleventh ..., Volume 2

Thomas Warton - 1840 - 572 pages
...his riding dress, and his genial aspect, is painted in lively colours. I saw his sieves purfiled01 at the bond, With gris", and that the finest of the lond. And for to fasten his hode under his chinne He hadde of gold ywrought a curious pinne, A love-knotte...
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