Censura Literaria: Containing Titles, Abstracts, and Opinions of Old English Books, with Original Disquisitions, Articles of Biography, and Other Literary Antiquities, Volume 3

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1807
 

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Page 234 - To BLOSSOMS FAIR pledges of a fruitful tree. Why do ye fall so fast? Your date is not so past, But you may stay yet here awhile To blush and gently smile, And go at last.
Page 232 - Her eyes the glow-worm lend thee, The shooting stars attend thee, And the elves also, Whose little eyes glow Like the sparks of fire, befriend thee. No Will o...
Page 115 - Thy shades, thy silence, now be mine, Thy charms my only theme ; My haunt the hollow cliff, whose pine Waves o'er the gloomy stream, Whence! the scared owl on pinions grey Breaks from the rustling boughs, And down the lone vale sails away To more profound repose.
Page 232 - That age is best, which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.
Page 388 - Your dear self can best witness the manner, being done in loose sheets of paper, most of it in your presence, the rest by sheets sent unto you as fast as they were done.
Page 236 - And trace the hare i' th' treacherous snow ; Thy witty wiles to draw, and get The lark into the trammel net ; Thou hast thy cockrood and thy glade To take the precious pheasant made ; Thy lime-twigs, snares and pit-falls then To catch the pilfering birds, not men.
Page 233 - Since ghost there is none to affright thee. Let not the dark thee cumber ; What though the moon does slumber? The stars of the night Will lend thee their light, Like tapers clear without number. Then, Julia, let me woo thee, Thus, thus to come unto me ; And when I shall meet Thy silvery feet, My soul I'll pour into thee.
Page 48 - Summer's ardent strength, Thy sober Autumn fading into age, And pale concluding Winter comes at last, And shuts the scene.
Page 232 - And neerer he's to setting. That age is best, which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer ; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times, still succeed the former.
Page 311 - Put you on the. armour of God, that you may be able to stand against the deceits of the devil...

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