History of the French Consulate, Under Napoleon Buonaparte: Being an Authentic Narrative of His Administration, which is So Little Known in Foreign Countries. Including a Sketch of His Life. The Whole Interspersed with Curious Anecdotes and a Faithful Statement of Interesting Transactions, Until the Renewal of Hostilities in 1803

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Thomas Hurst, 1804 - 535 pages
 

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Page 88 - Bonaparte, who had been regarding the scene through a telescope, when he saw the smoke ascending, could not restrain his joy, but broke out into exclamations of approval ; indeed, he had just reason to dread the refusal of his troops thus to dishonour themselves.
Page 488 - I have written, when she recollects the unparalleled sufferings endured by the unoffending countries into which, during the last war, a French army penetrated; and she will at least hesitate to believe that the same armies should voluntarily ameliorate their conduct in a country more remote, where the atrocities they might commit would be less liable to publicity, and that this extraordinary change should be in favour of a people, whose principles and resistance might have excited the resentment...
Page 89 - Buonaparte was too cautious, and sent Berthier to enforce obedience. " When the Turks had all fallen, the French troops humanely endeavoured to put a period to the sufferings of the wounded, but some time elapsed before the bayonet could finish what the fire had not destroyed, and probably many languished days in agony.
Page 89 - Such a fact should not, however, be alleged without some proof, or leading circumstance stronger than assertion, being produced to support it ; but there would be a want of generosity in naming individuals, and branding them to the latest posterity with infamy, for obeying a command when their submission became an act of necessity, since the whole army did not mutiny against the execution...
Page 88 - ... prisoners,* ordered them to be marched to a rising ground near Jaffa, where a division of French infantry formed against them. When the Turks had entered into their fatal alignment, and t r jp mournful preparations were completed, the signal gun fired.
Page 92 - Is there a Frenchman whose blood does not chill with horror at the recital of such a fact. Surely the manes of these murdered unoffending people must be now hovering round the seat of government, and If a doubt should still exist as to the veracity of this statement, let the members of the Institute at Cairo be asked what passed in their sitting after the return of Buonaparte from Syria.
Page 229 - His hold upon France is the sword, and he has no other. Is he connected with the soil, or with the habits, the affections, or the prejudices of the country? He is a stranger, a foreigner, and a usurper.
Page 87 - Jaffa by assault, many of the garrison were put to the sword ; but the greater part flying into the mosques and imploring mercy from their pursuers, were granted their lives ; and let it be well remembered...
Page 92 - ... full details of the poisoning of the sick, and the massacre of the garrison ; aggravating these crimes by charging Buonaparte with strangling previously at Rosetta, a number of French and Copts, who were ill of the plague; thus proving, that this disposal of his sick was a premeditated plan, which he wished to introduce into general practice. In vain Buonaparte attempted to justify himself. The members sat petrified with terror, and almost doubted whether the scene passing before their eyes was...
Page 89 - French officers, by whom these details " are partly furnished, declared, that this was a *' scene, the retrospect of which tormented their " recollection, and that they could not reflect on " it without horror, accustomed as they had

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