Cumberland's British Theatre: With Remarks, Biographical and Critical : Printed from the Acting Copies, as Performed at the Theatres-royal, London, Volume 10

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George Daniel
John Cumberland, 1826
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Page 48 - ... refuse us. Well, we would kill them ; challenge twenty more, kill them; twenty more, kill them ; twenty more, kill them too ; and thus would we kill every man his twenty a day, that's twenty score; twenty score, that's two hundred ;' two hundred a day, five days a thousand; forty thousand ; forty times five, five times forty, two hundred days kills them all up by computation. And this will I venture my poor gentleman-like carcase to perform, provided there be no treason practised upon us, by...
Page 47 - Why thus, sir. I would select nineteen more, to myself. throughout the land; gentlemen they should be of good spirit, strong and able constitution; I would choose them by an instinct, a character that I have: and I would teach these nineteen the special rules, as your punto, your reverso, your stoccata, your imbroccato, your passada, your montanto; till they could all play very near, or altogether as well as myself.
Page 57 - Mat. I wonder, captain, what they will say of my going away, ha? Bob. Why, what should they say; but as of a discreet gentleman; quick, wary, respectful of nature's fair lineaments? and that's all. Mat. Why so! but what can they say of your beating?
Page 26 - Art thou a man? and sham'st thou not to beg? To practise such a servile kind of life? Why, were thy education ne'er so mean, Having thy limbs, a thousand fairer courses Offer themselves to thy election. Either the wars might still supply thy wants...
Page 33 - In two hours' absence ; well, I will not go. Two hours ! No, fleering Opportunity, I will not give your subtilty that scope.
Page 42 - Slight, stay, let's see what he dare do. Cut off his ears ! cut a whetstone. You are an ass", do you see ; touch any man here, and, by this hand, I'll run my rapier to the hilts in you.
Page 47 - Yet all this lenity will not overcome their spleen; they will be doing with the pismire, raising a hill a man may spurn abroad with his foot at pleasure. By myself, I could have slain them all, but I delight not in murder. I am...
Page 17 - Mat. Faith, yesterday, they say : a young gallant, a friend of mine, told me so. Bob. By the foot of Pharaoh, an' twere my case now, I should send him a chartel presently.
Page 66 - Nay, excellent justice, since I have laid myself thus open to you, now stand strong for me; both with your sword and your balance. Clem. Body O
Page 21 - Though not reposed in that security As I could wish : but I must be content, Howe'er I set a face on't to the world. Would I had lost this finger at a venture, So Wellbred had ne'er lodged within my house.

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