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MISCELLANEOUS COMMUNICATI- || ACCOUNT OF ALL NEW PATENTS,

ONS FROM CORRESPONDENTS, LIST OF NEW BOOKS AND IMPOR-
ON ALL SUBJECTS OF LITERA-

TATIONS.
TURE AND SCIENCE.

REGISTER OF DISEASES IN LONDON.
MEMOIRS OF DISTINGUISHED PER-

RETROSPECT OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS.
SONS.

LIST OF BANKRUPTCIES AND DI-
ORIGINAL LETTERS, ANECDOTES,

VIDENDS
&c.

DOMESTIC OCCURRENCES CLASSED
POETRY.

AND ARRANGED IN THE GEOGRA-
LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL

PHICAL ORDER OF THE COUN.
INTELLIGENCE.

TIES.
PROCEEDINGS OF LEARNED SOCIE-

MARRIAGES, DEATHS, BIOGRAPHI.
TIES.

CAL MEMOIRS, &c.
REVIEW OF THE NEW MUSIC.

REPORT OF THE STATE OF COM-
REVIEW OF THE FINE ARTS.

MERCE, &c.
REVIEW OF ENGLISH, GERMAN, REPORT OF AGRICULTURE, &c.
FRENCH, SPANISH, AND AME-

REPORT OF THE WEATHER.
RICAN LITERATURE.

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bathtert.

London:
PRINTED FOR RICHARD PHILLIPS, No. 71, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH-YARD.

By whom Communications (Post-paid) are thankfully received.

( Price Twelve Shillings half-lound.)

Printed by J. Anlarn, Duke-street, West-Smithfield.

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MAGAZINE

No: 104.]

AUGUST 1, 1803.

(No. 1, of Vol. 16.

To the Editor of the Monthly Magazine. Should one attack be d:feated, it would SIR,

be renewed again and again, till our efTH "He public mind has lately been im- forts were crowned with success, and the

pressed with the belief that an inva. enemy's armament rendered u.elels, or ana fion of this country is not only a possible, nihilated. but even a probable event.

Until, then, we have totally failed as I would by no means discourage the assailants, the idea of a serious or forini. preparations which are making to meet dable invasion ought to be treated wih the threatened attack ; but Iconlider it my utter contempt by every man of commun duty to expose a fa'se impression, which tense or prudence. The enemy may perhas lately tended to destroy the confi- chance vomit on our coalts a few hundred cence between man and man, that is so troops, the unhappy victims of their maessential to the welfare and prosperity of a lice they may rep at the follies of Fishe commercial nation like Britain.

guard and Killala ; but such invasions as My countrymen ought to feel, that, in thole will serve rather to keep alive our order to fucceed in his design, it is not national spirit, than to excite in us any enough that the Chief CONSUL of serious aların ! FRANCE, in the furor of his ambition, should it be urged, that the enemy Avuld will, wish, or threaten, an invasion may make preparations in several ports at of this country! Before he can enable the Tame time, with a view to transport any formidable" force to effect a landing, leveral armies ; I apply the same systein of he has great and expensive preparations to offence to several poris as to one, and with make, he hasdifficulties of a physical nature greater certainty of succes.* They canto encounter, and he has the vigilance, not launch a hoat, or drive a nail, in any the power, and the peculiar resources of one of their ports, without being seen or this country to overcome.

heard by our bold and vigilant cruizers : In the first place he mult collect toge. a state of matured preparations on their ther from various ports the numerous vef- part, and the moment of reiterated and fels and finall.craft which are neceffary successful assault on 'ours, will, therefore, to transport his army ;

the always accompany each other, till the eneo coasts of France and Holland are cover. niy are tired of the expences and useless çd w.th our cruizers, very few of them toil of preparation. would escape; and it may be presumed, In this view of the lubject, it will without the hazard of contradiction, tħat scarcely be necessary to suppose that the four out of five of those vessels moving enemy's armament will ever be able to along the French coat from one port to make their appearance at sea. Should anuthier, would either be captured or de- they, however, baffle our assaults, so as troyed.

to preserve the integrity of their Acet, and Suppose this difficulty firmounted, and have the temerity, in the face of our na. ? multitude of vesels" affembled in any val forces, to come out of their harbours, port of France, fufficient for the transport the English cruizers, who every day. cloles of army,

what would be the obvious ly watch their motions, and could be at policy of the British Government ? no loss to anticipate their precise intenThey wou'd instantly commit to our brave tions, will, of course, be assembled in failors and foldiers the task of entering fufficient force to lay all the hopes of the such

port, and of burning, scuttling, and enemy, and the fears of our women and finking the whole of the assembled fleet. The more of them, the more certain

* As I congder a descent to be a most ridi. would be their destruction ; and there is culous bugbear, I lay no stress on the absurnot a single port of France or Holland, dity of such a separation of the enemy's (Brest excepted, and that port is not suited forces, nor on the additional certainty of their to the purpole,) that could protect them

being successively cut to pieces, should they from the attack of our fuperior and relo- in this divided manner attempt or effect a lute naval forces,

y landing, MONTHLY MAG. No, 104,

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children, alleep at the boitom of the hostility of the enemy, we were nevet' in. ocean !

vaded ! It appears, then, that before the ene And at this time, we are undisputed my CAN LEAVE THEIR OWN COASTS, masters of the ocean, and THE ENEMY they have the following difficulties to over ARE UNABLE TO SEND A FLEET, OK come, each of them in all probability EVEN A SINGLE SHIP, TO SEA !!! fatal to their designs :

How long, then, shall we endure, at 1. In order to assemble an armament of so proud a period, 10 have our common fufficient magnitude, their veljels muf fenfe insulted, and our national and perhave the good fortune to elude the vigilance fonal prosperity interrupted, by the misof our numerous cruizers.

CHIEVOUS ALARM OF INVASION ? 2. In case of their success in assembling

COMMON SENSE. a fleet, or fleets, in any of their ports, an London, July 6, 1803. event which would be instantly known, they must be supposed to be able to refiji

To the Editor of the Monthly Magazine, the reiterated attacks of our hitberto invincible navalforces.

SIR, 3. Suppofing that all our attempts to de N the present crisis, when the interrupProy their armaments in port are fruftrated, an isue which cannot reasonably be has occasioned such anxiety in the comanticipated, they must then (if they dare) mercial world, it may afförd satisfaction come out, and face our naval forces, which to many of your readers to present them will be assembled and prepared to receive with a slight sketch of the course now to and destroy them.

be pursued by travellers to Hamburgh, inAfter taking this fair and natural view stead of the direct one up the Elbe, or ·by of the enemy's project, and of its regular land on its south west bank. and necessary consequences, I prelume Tonningen, to which the packets now that until my conclusions are proved to be fail once every week, is situated in 54.20 unfairly drawn from the premists, or iny degrees north latitude, in the duchy of premiles themselves proved to be un. Slelwig, on the north fide of the Eyder, founded, no reader will entertain the which divides that duchy from Holstein, opinion, that an invasion of the British and is rendered navigable as far as Ren:ilIands at this time is either probable or burg, where it joins the canal which

forins the nearest communication between Having thus demonstrated that the ene- the North Sea and the Baltic, even for my's army CAN NEVER LEAVE THEIR Dips of. considerable burden. A small own shores, , it would indeerl be dultrict furrounds Tonningen, of which it insulting common sense, to expatiare on is the capital; and it has a commodious the impoffibility of their making good a road, the passage to which from the sea is, landing on ours, assailed as they would be like the mouth of the Elbe, surrounded by by our shipping, and by our land-forces, sands. The first post-station in Holstein which, apprized of their motions, would is Lunderi, at the distance of three quarbe fully prepared to receive them. ters of a German mile, '(of which fifteen

Before I conclude this appeal to the are equal to a degree). From Lunden to good sense of my countrymen, let me Meldorf is three miles and a half, through call their attention to the present pre- Heyde, which is also a post-station. From eminence of our navy, and to the conse. Meldorf it is five miles to Itzehoe, a city of quent security which it confers ușon this fone commercial importance, containing Empire. During former wars, the fieets about five thousand inhabitants, fituated of ine enemy have boldly left their ports ; on the north side of the river Störr, This and if they have met with the fleets of post may be divided into two, there being Britain, they have not hesitated to en. a post-house and inn called Hohenhörn, counter them ; their fleets without inter. about half way, where the bridge and ruption have cruiled in our feas; and road-money is taken on goods, carriages, during the American war it will be recol. and cattle, of which latter the great numlected, that the combined fleets chased the ber that annually pass through, in their British grand fleet into Plyniouth, and way to Holland, and for the supply of dared for leveral days to lie off that Hamburg, forms the largest part of the port.

revenue which is here collected. From But during those wars, notwithstanda Itzehoe to Elmshorn, on the river Kruckau, ing the gasconades, and the perfevering is three miles and a quarter. This place

possible.

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