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" ... and they might still be compressed without any loss of facts or sentiments. An opposite fault may be imputed to the concise and superficial narrative of the first reigns from Commodus to Alexander; a fault of which I have never heard, except from... "
Autobiography: Illus. from His Letters, with Occasional Notes and Narratives - Page 191
by Edward Gibbon - 1846 - 381 pages
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Life of Torquato Tasso: With an Historical and Critical Account of ..., Volume 1

John Black - 1810
...soon tired, (says Gibbon, when speaking of his history, in the memoirs of his life,) I was soon tired with the modest practice of reading the manuscript...own performance ; no one has so deeply meditated on Remarks upoo the subject, no one is so sincerely interested in the event." consulting •' When a composition,...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 6

Edward Gibbon - 1826
...; a fault of which I have never beard, except from Mr. Hume, in bis last journey to London. Such an oracle might have been consulted and obeyed with rational...the manuscript to my friends. Of such friends, some •wUI praise from politeness, and some will criticise from vanity. The author himself is the best...
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The Literary Character

Isaac Disraeli - 1839 - 388 pages
...none ; and others, out of pure malice, see nothing but faults. " I was soon disgusted," says GIBBON, " with the modest practice of reading the manuscript to my friends. Of such friends some will praise for politeness, and some will criticise for vanity." Had several of our first writers set their fortunes...
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Miscellanies of Literature, Volume 1

Isaac Disraeli - 1840
...none ; and others, out of pure malice, see nothing but faults. " I was soon disgusted," says GIBBON, " with the modest practice of reading the manuscript to my friends. Of such friends some will praise for politeness, and some will criticise for vanity." Had several of our first writers set their fortunes...
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A Compendium of English Literature, Chronologically Arranged from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1854 - 776 pages
...Alexander; a fault of which I have never heard, except from Mr. Hume in his last journey to London. Such an oracle might have been consulted and obeyed with rational...such friends, some will praise from politeness, and sonic will criticise from vanity. The author himself is the best judge of his own performance ; no...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1856 - 776 pages
...journey to London. Such an oracle might have been consulted and obeyed with rational devotion ; hut I was soon disgusted with the modest practice of reading...will criticise from vanity. The author himself is the fcest judge of his own performance; no one has so deeply meditated on the subject; no one is so sincerely...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1848 - 776 pages
...sixteenth chapters have been reduced, by three successive revisals, from a large volume to their present best judge of his own performance ; no one has so...subject; no one is so sincerely interested in the event. The volume of my history, which had been somewhat delayed by the novelty and tumult of a first session,...
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New Biographies of Illustrious Men

1857 - 408 pages
...been submitted, if not to the " eyes," to the " ears " of others ; for he elsewhere tells us that he was " soon disgusted with the modest practice of reading the manuscript to his friends." • Such, however, were his preliminary difficulties, that he confesses he was often...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1858 - 762 pages
...Alexander; a fault of which I have never heard, except from Mr. Hume in his last journey to London. Such an oracle might have been consulted and obeyed with rational devotion ; but I WM soon disgusted with the modest practice of reading the manuscript to my friends. Of such friends,...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1859 - 762 pages
...advanced with a more equal and easy pace ; but the fifteenth and sixteenth chapters have been reduced, best judge of his own performance ; no one has so...subject; no one is so sincerely interested in the event. The volume of my history, which had been somewhat delayed by the novelty and tumult of a first session,...
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